Category Archives: Learning Disabilities

Children, Teens and Sleep (Guest: Dr. Robert Rosenberg)

BTRadioIntAs youngsters head back to school it’s critically important that they get sufficient sleep to maintain alertness and vitality. In this interview originally aired in November of 2015, sleep medicine specialist, Dr. Robert Rosenberg, offers insights in the sleep needs of children and teens, and how we can help them meet those needs effectively.

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As important as a good night’s rest is to all of us, it would be easy to underestimate the value of sleep in our lives. According to the National Center for Disease Control, however, 50-70 million Americans with sleep disorders clearly indicate how difficulty with sleep can lead to serious problems with vitality, productivity and overall health.

RRosenbergphotoPut another way, we need sufficient restorative sleep in order to survive and succeed.

What about the sleep needs of children and teens? What affects their sleep and what are the signs and symptoms that a youngster is sleep-deficient and struggling? Are children and teens with sleep issues ever misdiagnosed or mismanaged as having another physical, behavioral or emotional condition? How do we effectively identify, treat and manage sleep concerns in children and teens? Our guest on this program, physician, nationally-recognized sleep expert and author, Dr. Robert Rosenberg, will offer straight-talk insights and answers to these sleep questions and more.

RRosenbergbookDr. Rosenberg is board-certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases and Sleep Medicine. For the past two decades his practice has been limited exclusively to sleep medicine. Dr. Rosenberg is Medical Director of The Sleep Disorders Center of Prescott Valley in Arizona. His advice has appeared in columns and blogs of many popular magazines such as “O, The Oprah Magazine,” “Woman’s World,” “Prevention,” “Parenting” and “Ladies Home Journal,” among others. In addition his many appearances on television and radio, he hosts his own radio show, “Answers for Sleep” on HealthyLife.net. In this program we’re featuring his very popular book, Sleep Soundly Every Night, Feel Fantastic Every Day: A Doctor’s Guide to Solving Your Sleep Problems. (27:50)

www.answersforsleep.com

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Memoirs of an ADHD Mind (Guest: Melissa Hood)

The Changing Behavior NetworkIf you’ve ever wondered what a child, teen or adult with ADHD experiences, here’s a first-hand account from Melissa Hood. The insights and interventions she offers are loaded with value. We present, “Memoirs of an ADHD Mind.”

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Missy Hood, Melissa Hood, Memoirs of an ADHD MindADHD

The diagnostic condition of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) has been recognized and utilized by medical and mental health professionals for some time now. Medications and treatments for this condition can be quite effective.

That said, those folks who seldom encounter or work with individuals presenting this condition generally know very little about it. It’s easy to say to such a child, teen or adult, “You just need to concentrate on what you’re doing, that’s all,” or “You know, if you’d only think before you do some of the things you do, you wouldn’t get into so much trouble.”

Good Intentions, But …

Statements like these might mean well, but they don’t work very well. After all, if an ADHD youngster (or adult) could concentrate better or be less “scattered,” they would have accomplished it a long time ago. They struggle because their capabilities for concentration, focus and control over impulse are affected.

Memoirs of an ADHD Mind, Melissa HoodLessons from the “Inside”

In this program, guest Melissa (Missy) Hood, author of Memoirs of an ADHD Mind, takes us on a journey of what it feels like to struggle with a condition that can dramatically affect learning, behavior and relationships in so many ways.

In Missy’s case, she wasn’t officially diagnosed with ADHD until she was in her 20s. Listen in as she shares what it was like to struggle in her learning with some teachers, but not with others … and WHY. As an adult, Missy lost 40 jobs in 15 years. Her explanation of the “why” of these difficulties, and what we can all do to better work with and relate to ADHD-affected individuals, is insightful … and potentially life-changing.

Melissa Hood

Braced with the support of a few resourceful teachers, her understanding parents and a strong faith, Missy make it through some very difficult times.  College was a huge obstacle for her, but she eventually went on to earn both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Currently, Missy is a doctoral student earning her Doctor of Education degree in Transformational Leadership. And, of course, as an encourager, Missy is deeply involved in sharing her book and its message with as many folks as possible. (28:50)

www.MissyHood.com

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BONUS: Here’s a complimentary chart from Missy regarding structure and coping skills as they would apply to an ADHD-affected individual. [link]

 

 

Straight Talk about Learning Disabilities, Part 2 (Guest: Laura Reiff)

The subjectLaura Reiff, Straight Talk About Learning Disabilities, learning disabilities, special education of learning disabilities can bring as many questions as answers. What are they, and how do children and teens “get” learning disabilities? What do parents and students need to know about learning disabilities, and what happens after a youngster is diagnosed? What are the responsibilities of the school to students diagnosed with learning disabilities, how are identified students to be taught, and how is progress measured and documented? In other words, what is the straight talk about learning disabilities?

And what about behavior? Does the child or teen with a learning disability ever present emotional or behavioral issues? If so how are they best addressed?

These are all good questions. Laura Reiff, our guest on this program will assist us in removing some of the mystery associated with learning disabilities, and she’ll replace it with insights gained from years of teaching learning disabled students.

The Adventures of Naomi Noodles, Laura ReiffSome insights might surprise you. For instance, did you know that many learning disabled students are quite bright? Did you know that federal law directs the effective education of children and teens diagnosed with learning disabilities?

Laura has a heart for helping students and their families to better understand learning disabilities and to lift what can be a negative stigma associated with Special Education. As a coach, guide and consultant, she operates a special website (posted below) that supports the needs and concerns of parents of children with learning disabilities. Laura is also involved in the writing of children’s books that help youngsters better understand learning disabilities and how they are addressed. Her first project, The Adventures of Naomi Noodles, is a book about a young girl coping with learning disabilities. (23:50)

www.about-special-education.com

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Straight Talk about Learning Disabilities, Part 1 (Guest: Laura Reiff)

The subjectLaura Reiff, Straight Talk About Learning Disabilities, learning disabilities, special education of learning disabilities can bring as many questions as answers. What are they, and how do children and teens “get” learning disabilities? What do parents and students need to know about learning disabilities, and what happens after a youngster is diagnosed? What are the responsibilities of the school to students diagnosed with learning disabilities, how are identified students to be taught, and how is progress measured and documented? In other words, what is the straight talk about learning disabilities?

And what about behavior? Does the child or teen with a learning disability ever present emotional or behavioral issues? If so how are they best addressed?

These are all good questions. Laura Reiff, our guest on this program will assist us in removing some of the mystery associated with learning disabilities, and she’ll replace it with insights gained from years of teaching learning disabled students.

The Adventures of Naomi Noodles, Laura ReiffSome insights might surprise you. For instance, did you know that many learning disabled students are quite bright? Did you know that federal law directs the effective education of children and teens diagnosed with learning disabilities?

Laura has a heart for helping students and their families to better understand learning disabilities and to lift what can be a negative stigma associated with Special Education. As a coach, guide and consultant, she operates a special website (posted below) that supports the needs and concerns of parents of children with learning disabilities. Laura is also involved in the writing of children’s books that help youngsters better understand learning disabilities and how they are addressed. Her first project, The Adventures of Naomi Noodles, is a book about a young girl coping with learning disabilities. (23:50)

www.about-special-education.com

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Helping and Empowering the Self-Defeating Child (Guest: Leslie Rogers)

 

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75One nice thing about the years The Changing Behavior Network has been posting programs is the fact that we have a great set of archives. Here’s one from November of 2013. It addresses issues of the self-defeating child. Our  thanks to Leslie. –JDS

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Leslie Rogers, self-defeating child, Created to SoarIt seems that some kids have a way of hurting their own outcomes with self-defeating gestures and behaviors. What they’re doing doesn’t make much sense sometimes, issues with the self-defeating child go on and on.

What’s happening with youngsters that makes them so hard on themselves? Is there a way to help these young people climb out of the hole they’ve dug for themselves? Can we help them and point them in a more positive and more productive direction? Fortunately, the answer is “Yes.”

Our guest on this program, Leslie Rogers, will help us understand how a child or teen’s negative thoughts, beliefs and feelings can limit their potential and rob them of hope. Leslie will also offer insights into how we can empower these young people to move beyond their self-defeating ways. And, when that happens, EVERYONE wins.

Creaated to Soar, Leslie Rogers, Dianne MatraversLeslie, a mother of four, has long had a passion for the well-being of young people. She knows, first-hand, the sort of self-defeating thoughts and feelings that come at youngsters today from all directions. As a result of what she has gained through her own journey, Leslie shares through her writing, her speaking and her mentoring that young people do have the ability and the power to discover who they are and where they are going.

Leslie is the author of two children’s books, Created to Soar and It is ME. (27:50)

http://www.gigglequick.com

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Motivating Students for Better School Performance (Guest: Ruth Herman Wells)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75There’s just no way around the fact that school is performance-driven. Students are expected to do their best at school, and they are expected to be motivated and remain motivated to achieve academically.

Ruth Herman WellsUnfortunately, expecting students to be motivated doesn’t make it so. According to our guest on this program, Ruth Herman Wells, expecting motivation is precisely the problem. Capable students, as well as those who struggle, don’t come with a convenient switch that turns on their desire to achieve and put effort into their studies. It’s up to teachers (and parents) to teach motivation as if it were any other teachable skill.

But how do effective, caring and competent teachers actually access and teach skills of student motivation? According to Ruth, this sort of training in the motivation of students by teachers is in short supply. Result: Students simply are expected to be motivated, and the problems continue.

Youth Change Workshops, motivating students, student motivationFrom her years of experience in training educators across the country, Ruth shares how youngsters can be motivated at school and how they can realize, sometimes permanently realize, how motivation is important for them and their future.

Ruth Herman Wells, Motivation Makers, motivation of students by teachers, school is performance-drivenListen in as Ruth shares some great ideas for struggling students and, yes, for struggling teachers as well. Just remember, a little success can become very contagious!

Ruth Herman Wells is the Director of Youth Change Workshops out of Oregon. In addition to being an outstanding seminar leader and trainer of educators and other child-service professionals, Ruth has managed programs for delinquent, troubled and problem youth.  Shes the author of dozens of books, including the one we are featuring today, All the Best Answers for the Worst Kid Problems: Maximum-Strength Motivation-Makers. (32:59)

www.youthchg.com

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Memory Problems in Young People: Impact and Intervention (Guest: Dr. Milton Dehn)

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As we learn more sophisticated and more accurate ways to assess issues that affect learning and achievement in young people, we gain valuable information regarding the impact of memory. We are learning, for instance, that problems with a child’s or teen’s short-term or working memory might well be a primary concern in a learning disability. Memory problems can also be a component of attention deficits and other conditions and diagnoses not generally thought to be associated with memory.

Identifying memory problems is one thing; addressing them is yet another. In this program, Dr. Milton Dehn, nationally recognized expert on psychological processing assessment, working memory and children’s long-term memory problems, shares the depth of concerns related to memory. And, of course, he offers interventions derived from evidence-based assessment and research, interventions teachers (and parents) can use to help youngsters strengthen their memory skills. Many of these come from his latest book (with CD), Helping Students Remember, a go-to resource with built-in memory-related lesson plans that can be implemented immediately. Techniques include visualization, locations, pegwords, chunking and grouping, and putting memory words into sentences. He also discussed meta memory and how it is important for a child or teen to know about their memory and how they are progressing as they do the exercises and implement the strategies.

A former school psychologist and trainer of school psychology graduate students, Dr. Dehn is a private practice school psychologist, consultant, presenter and author of several books on memory and learning. He is the co-founder of Schoolhouse Educational Services and the program director for Schoolhouse Tutoring(R), both based in Wisconsin. (25:26)

www.workingmemoryonline.com

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Spotlight Feature: Unlocking Parental Intelligence (Guest: Dr. Laurie Hollman)

BTSpotlightDr. Laurie Hollman’s book, Unlocking Parental Intelligence, is very new. It reveals many insights into how parents can realize better discipline and improved relationships with their children by becoming “meaning makers.” We caught up with Laurie to visit with her on the writing of the book and the impact she would like to see it create.

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Laurie, what was the inspiration, the driving force, behind the writing of Unlocking Parental Intelligence?

It’s hard to write in the past tense about my “inspiration” for writing about Parental Intelligence even though the book is finished and published because I continue to write about the concept. My inspiration has had and continues to have many sources for which I am grateful—the children and parents I treat in my clinical practice and my own children. I’m fortunate to be able to keep on writing about Parental Intelligence for Huffington Post, so I can reach more and more parents and receive their feedback and questions. I’m still inspired!

As my three decades of psychoanalytic practice and research progressed, I incorporated the voices of so many mothers and fathers who came at different stages in parenting. Feeling thankful to those parents for telling me how unlocking their Parental Intelligence benefited their families, I was compelled to narrow Parental Intelligence into five accessible steps for others to grow from.

My children were raised with Parental Intelligence. It was natural for me to want to understand their minds—their thoughts, feelings, intentions, and imaginings. It’s wonderful to share trust and love with your children. I hadn’t coined the term, Parental Intelligence, when I was a young mother, but I was practicing it nonetheless and wanted others to have the same good fortune to have empathetic, industrious kids with great senses of humor who enjoy learning, creating, and relating well with others. They have been and surely are an inspiration for my writing.

What were your biggest challenges in writing the book?

I love words! I revel in finding the right word to express what I’m feeling and thinking. I remember working hard on Part I: Developing Your Parental Intelligence to develop five accessible steps for parents to gain Parental Intelligence: Stepping Back, Self-Reflecting, Understanding Your Child’s Mind, Understanding Your Child’s Development and Problem Solving. With each step, I wanted to be talking with my readers through my writing.

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Once the five steps were in place, one of the favorite but difficult parts of writing this book became writing Part II: Stories of Parental Intelligence in Practice. Writing short stories was new for me. I wrote about eight youngsters, their families and the challenges they faced, with examples like a two-year-old’s temper tantrums, a jealous identical twin who would hit his brother, and a lonely, though brilliant, seventeen year old.

I began to live with these characters. I remember finishing a chapter about a little boy who drew a picture that led his father to finally understand what he was going through. I was drained—I felt so much for this boy who felt he was a “bad, bad” child when he was so sensitive and wonderful.

I wanted my readers to really get to know the parents and children I was writing about and to care about them. I wanted to bring my readers into the lives of these people, to identify with them, and then naturally learn Parental Intelligence rather than feel like it was an intellectual exercise.

I hope my readers find themselves interrupting their reading to rest the book on their laps just to muse about the characters and let their minds wander into their own lives with their children. In that way, I hope they get to know themselves and their children better—loving them even more.

Writing became relaxing for me. I guess I would “get into the zone.” This experience led me to write to parents through Moms Magazine and Huffington Post. It was a shift from writing scholarly works for psychoanalytic journals and books to writing for the popular press, but I find it challenging and exciting. The book gave me the opportunity to write about what I knew very well and felt very deeply and now I can continue to do that.

You make an interesting turn on the word “unlocking” in the book’s title. What was your purpose there?

I think parents should never be underestimated even when they have self-doubts. When I first have a consultation with distressed parents and ask them questions, they are surprised how much they know about their child. As a psychoanalyst and writer I want to help parents organize what they know and harness this knowledge with the use of Parental Intelligence. In this way, I “unlock” what they know and help them use it in ways they haven’t before.

The five steps take the parents on a journey where they unlock their Parental Intelligence and get to know the underlying problems behind their child’s behavior. The behavior is really sending messages. The key is to understand and decipher those messages.

By unlocking Parental Intelligence parents learn how to understand why children do what they do, what is on their minds, and how they can comprehend their child’s inner world. The behavior is the catalyst to change as words rather than behavior become the vehicle for improved communication and connections between parent and child.

What distinguishes your approach from other approaches to parent-child conflict resolution?

My approach is distinguished by my intent to help parents become “meaning makers” by understanding and applying the three basic, interrelated tenets of Parental Intelligence. First, behaviors have underlying meanings. Second, once parents understand how their own minds are working, they are liberated to understand their child—how their child’s mind is working. And third, once meanings are clear, options surface by which to change puzzling behaviors.

When these three core concepts come into play and parents are faced with misbehavior, first they ask, “What does it mean?” not “What do I do?” With this in mind, the ambiance of family life fundamentally changes.

When parents get to know themselves—their reactions to their child and the many influences on their parenting—they find that they gain a better understanding of their child who wants to be known as he or she actually is. This means that parents no longer focus on the child’s specific misbehavior as the overarching troubles and problems emerge. When those problems are addressed, the original misbehavior loses importance and usually stops. Parents learn how to understand the underlying determinants to their child’s behavior, how to ‘read’ nonverbal as well as verbal communication, and how to create an open dialogue.

You write about politics and parenting. That’s interesting; tell us about that.

My epithet for the last chapter is: “When children’s voices are heard, leaders are born.” My younger son contributed to Part III: The Future with Parental Intelligence with his millennial voice. I’ll let him speak for himself:

“America seems to be in a period of political dogma, a place where certitude is more important than nuance and understanding.” This certainty “is masqueraded as strength, but it really comes out of ignorance and fear. I think you can argue that parents fighting with a child, letting their ego get involved, are doing so out of fear of the unknown, unconsciously using a survival reflex, defending themselves unnecessarily. The only thing that can combat fear is knowledge: knowing there’s a technique to deal with understanding what’s happening in someone else’s mind. And that technique is Parental Intelligence. If Parental Intelligence were taught, if people were encouraged to understand one another before reflexively trying to defend themselves, if trying to empathize and know others’ minds was seen as a strength, we’d live in a more compassionate, if not more efficient, society.”

When a parent reads Unlocking Parental Intelligence, what do you hope is their single most important take-away?

I want parents to think of themselves as “meaning makers,” of course. By the end of the book, if not before, I’d like parents to take away the set of tools needed to help understand their children’s behavior and in turn become more effective parents. Parenting will feel more pleasurable, inspiring, and gratifying. Their children will be grateful, thinking, capable, and loving. ###

 

Dr. Laurie Hollman is an experienced psychoanalyst and author who has written extensively for many publications. Her faculty positions have included New York University and The Society for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. [website]

 

 

When Behavior Becomes Desperate: Insights and Interventions (Guest: Dr. James Sutton)

BTRadioIntThreat and danger don’t even have to be real to be a problem. There are youngsters (adults, too) who, for any number reasons, live in a constant state of alert. Behaviors of others toward them, even something as mild as one step too many into their personal space, brings a reation that hardly fits the circumstance.

Because this behavior is based on survival and fueled by fear, typical responses and discipline easily can worsen subsequent behavior as it increases the perceived threat. It’s a vicious cycle, and it’s difficult to stop. Exactly how do we negotiate with one’s need to survive?

Our guest on this program, The Changing Behavior Network’s founder and host, Dr. James Sutton, calls this Desperate Behavior, for that’s precisely what it is. Considering all of a school’s students, desperate behavior is rare. It occurs in only about 1-3% of the entire population, but it accounts for the majority of the problems, as well as the lingering misery of affected youngsters.

Since traditional approaches often fail, something different is needed, and that’s the focus of this program. It’s also addressed in Dr. Sutton’s newest book, The Changing Behavior Book.

A nationally recognized child and adolescent psychologist, author and speaker, Dr. James Sutton is in demand for his expetise on emotionally and behaviorally troubled youngsters, and his skill for sharing it. A former Special Education teacher, he is the founder and host of The Changing Behavior Network, a popular internet radio-style podcast supporting young people and their families. 23:58)

(Dr. Sutton has made an arrangement with the publisher for listeners to receive a FREE copy of his bestseller, 101 Ways to Make Your Classroom Special, when they order a copy of The Changing Behavior Book. For more information or to order, CLICK HERE and use the password supplied at the end of this program.)

www.DocSpeak.com

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Children, Teens and Sleep (Guest: Dr. Robert Rosenberg)

BTRadioIntAs important as a good night’s rest is to all of us, it would be easy to underestimate the value of sleep in our lives. According to the National Center for Disease Control, however, 50-70 million Americans with sleep disorders clearly indicate how  difficulty with sleep can lead to serious problems with vitality, productivity and overall health.

RRosenbergphotoPut another way, we need sufficient restorative sleep in order to survive and succeed.

What about the sleep needs of children and teens? What affects their sleep and what are the signs and symptoms that a youngster is sleep-deficient and struggling? Are children and teens with sleep issues ever misdiagnosed or mismanaged as having another physical, behavioral or emotional condition? How do we effectively identify, treat and manage sleep concerns in children and teens? Our guest on this program, physician, nationally-recognized sleep expert and author, Dr. Robert Rosenberg, will offer straight-talk insights and answers to these sleep questions and more.

RRosenbergbookDr. Rosenberg is board-certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases and Sleep Medicine. For the past two decades his practice has been limited exclusively to sleep medicine. Dr. Rosenberg is Medical Director of The Sleep Disorders Center of Prescott Valley in Arizona. His advice has appeared in columns and blogs of many popular magazines such as “O, The Oprah Magazine,” “Woman’s World,” “Prevention,” “Parenting” and “Ladies Home Journal,” among others. In addition his many appearances on television and radio, he hosts his own radio show, “Answers for Sleep” on HealthyLife.net. In this program we’re featuring his very popular book, Sleep Soundly Every Night, Feel Fantastic Every Day: A Doctor’s Guide to Solving Your Sleep Problems. (27:50)

www.answersforsleep.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Link as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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