Category Archives: Motivation

Five String Recovery, Part 2 (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

A 16-year-old musician wins a national bluegrass championship while secretly battling addiction. Here’s the second of his two-part story about his recovery, his music, and his message to young people.

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Five String Recovery, Phillip WadlowThis is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now, but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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Helping Your Athlete to Win Consistently (Greg Warburton)

Physical skills being the same for a group of athletes, the difference between winning and losing is often a player’s mental approach to the game. It’s not about luck and happenstance. Learn more as we present, “Helping Your Athlete to Win Consistently.”

Greg Warburton, Helping Your Athlete to Win ConsistentlyMental Training Makes the Difference

Mental and emotional focus, preparation and practice are the hallmark of athletes and teams that consistently win. In this interview, mental training consultant and author, Greg Warburton, will introduce us to a sports mental training program he has developed, a program with proven results. Greg is the author of Warburton’s Winning System: Tapping and Other Transformational Mental Training Tools for Athletes.

Energy Psychology and EFT

Warburton's Winning System, Greg WarburtonListen in as Greg describes an approach to mental toughness that’s related to Energy Psychology, a component of sport psychology. He will explain why it’s so critical to always be absolutely honest with one’s self, and why thoughts and actions should relate to “DO” rather than “DON’T.” He will also introduce a relatively new concept called “tapping,” a type of EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique). It’s a powerful and always available tool for maintaining calmness, clarity and focus.

Greg Warburton

In addition to his consultation with athletes as young as middle school, Greg has introduced his mental training winning systems to players on five Division I baseball teams; three of them because Division I College World Series Champions over a seven-year period. A fourth team from Oregon State University had several players and mental training proteges that won national awards.

Greg is also an experienced licensed professional counselor and author of the book, Ask More, Tell Less: A Practical Guide for Helping Children Achieve Self-Reliance.  (28:55)

www.gregwarburton.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Link as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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BONUS: Here’s a bonus from Greg, a guide entitled “Daily Mental Training in Sport Psychology.” Download it HERE.

5 Decluttering Myths Debunked (Alison Kero)

Our children are watching us … always. It’s not healthy when we hold onto things that clutter or physical and emotional space. It can affect how we function and the examples we set for our loved ones. Decluttering and organization expert, Alison Kero, has some great ideas here that can move us in a much better direction, a direction we want our kids to follow. We present, “5 Decluttering Myths Debunked.”

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Alison Kero, 5 Decluttering Myths DebunkedI’ve heard it all before; there are so many reasons people feel like they’ll never get organized. Too much stuff, too little time, no energy; the list goes on and on. These are false beliefs. Once we allow ourselves to think about decluttering and organizing as an exercise toward healthier habits, rather than as a difficult project, we can take some positive steps towards enjoying happier, healthier, more productive lives for ourselves and our families.

Here’s a list of my five favorite decluttering myths, along with reasons why they aren’t true.

Myth #1: “It’s Going to Be Hard”

Organizing does involve some light manual labor, so those with certain physical challenges may find it a bit more difficult, but really organizing is more of a mental challenge for most. Being open to recognizing the various emotions that your belongings have gathered with them along their journey with you can be difficult for many people.

There can be a collection of fear, guilt, shame and apathy associated with clutter; it’s often a challenge to face those emotions head-on. The great news is that these emotions are attached to inanimate objects! These things can’t get angry or sad at your expense.

They can’t judge you, either. You, however, can let those useless and damaging emotions go by simply taking them out of your house and over to the donation center, recycling center or dump. Think of it as your own personal therapy session and trust that you can’t do it wrong and you can always go back and make improvements as you see fit.

Myth #2:  “I Don’t Know How”

Organizing is about making decisions. What I love about decluttering is that the process lets you learn and practice making good decisions for yourself.

Personally, I find it’s actually the safest environment to do so. You get to be in control regarding how you want your home to look.  Best of all, there can be no wrong decisions.

Whatever you choose will be exactly right, no matter what. It’s just about what you like and need for yourself in your home, and, with some practice, it does become much easier – fun even, because you’re learning how to empower yourself and learning what you like in the process.

Myth #3: “I Don’t Know WHERE to Begin”

Conquering Emotional Clutter, Alison Kero, ACK Organizing. Clearing Out the ClutterOverwhelm is the quickest way to stop a healthy habit. In organizing there will be moments where you do feel overwhelmed, but it’s okay. It’s about making one choice at a time, then taking one step at a time to help you take action versus giving in to overwhelm and stopping altogether.

When you view your clutter as a whole or your home as one entire project, it may seem extremely challenging to even think about decluttering. However, when you start to break the project down into smaller, more manageable steps, it becomes doable, maybe even kind of easy.

So, to start decluttering your house, pick one room to start and pick one category within that room. If you choose your bedroom, start with your wardrobe. Then pick one category within clothing, like jeans. Place all your jeans together and then, one-by-one, go through them, making a decision on each pair as to whether or not to keep them. Trust your instincts and know that the more often you go through your items, the easier it will become to make the right decisions for just about everything in your life.

Myth #4: “I Don’t Have the Time (or the Energy)”

Trust me, if you are low on time and/or energy, you NEED to declutter. This is how you will get more time and energy because you will be letting go of old emotions as well as physical and spiritual clutter. This is an easy way to do a body/mind/spirit cleanse without having to consume or buy anything weird.

The less clutter you have, the less time you’ll spend looking for lost items. You’ll also save mental and physical energy because you’re not wandering around looking for lost items.

Myth #5: “It Never Stays That Way for Long”

The day after you first learned to walk, did anyone expect you to know how to run a marathon? No, right? Why would you then expect that for yourself?

Creating positive change takes a little time. No one does it perfectly right away. It’s about making small decisions that, over time, lead to amazing changes in your life. It’s a process, and you can keep decluttering as you go throughout your entire life, and you can do it as you see fit. There’s no wrong or right way, it’s just about wanting to surround yourself with meaningful people, places and things for a happier, healthier, more productive life.

Since positive change doesn’t always happen overnight, it’s important to get used to the process in your own time. By letting go of fear, judgment and what you think the outcome “should” look like, you’ll help yourself overcome obstacles and create the changes more quickly.

Allow the process to come as you’re ready for it, and remember: It’s about making one, small, self love-based decision at a time to create the changes you want to see in your life and in the lives of your loved ones. ###

 

Speakers Group MemberLong before decluttering expert, writer and speaker, Alison Kero, started her first organizing business in 2004, she searched for ways to make her own life easier. Since implementing her new decluttering system, Alison has found she now enjoys increased energy, improved productivity and overall greater contentment. She truly enjoys teaching this easy, effective system to her clients through her company, ACK Organizing. To reach Alison, go to http://www.ackorganizing.com.

Building Character Using Analogies from Nature (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

The Changing Behavior NetworkCharacter counts, and it always will. Barbara Lewis, nationally acclaimed educator and author of Building Character with True Stories from Nature, shares some excellent ways to teach principles of character using examples from animals and plants. From our archives we present, “Building Character Using Analogies from Nature.”

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Sometimes the best lessons in life are best NOT taught directly. Telling Tommy how he needs to be more helpful like his sister might only create resentment toward her with no change in his willingness to help others. So how do we effectively encourage desired behaviors and habits in youngsters like Tommy?

Teaching Positive Character Traits

Our guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, will show us a better way to emphasize and teach positive character traits by using analogies, true stories from the behaviors of animals (and even plants).

Since children are naturally drawn to stories and to animals, they not only attend to these analogies, they are stimulated to exercise higher-level thinking skills and, best of all, apply the message. Result: Moral development is enhanced, and youngsters are motivated to create positive changes in a natural and comfortable way.

Listen in as Barbara shares some stimulating and intriguing examples of what animals and plants can teach us about character.

Barbara A. Lewis

Barbara has earned national acclaim and many honors and awards for her work as a teacher and as an author. She encourages youngsters to apply their skills in solving real problems. In fact, while Barbara was a teacher at Jackson Elementary School in Salt Lake City, her students were deeply involved in numerous civic and environmental projects, garnering ten national awards, including two presentations of the President’s Environmental Youth Award.

Prominent print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, Family Circle, “CBS World News” and CNN, have featured Barbara and her work. The book we are featuring, written for parents and educators, is Building Character with True Stories from Nature. The book is published by Free Spirit Publishing. (26:22)

www.BarbaraALewis.com

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Raising Kids That Succeed: When Beliefs Matter (Guest: Dr. Lynn Wicker)

The Changing Behavior NetworkIn this informative and eye-opening interview, Dr. Sutton interviews educator and author, Dr. Lynn Wicker, on the critical parenting characteristics of beliefs, intention and purpose.  The Changing Behavior Network presents “Raising Kids That Succeed: When Beliefs Matter.”

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Beliefs Matter

Dr. Lynn Wicker, Raising Kids That SucceedTo a great extent, our lives follow our beliefs. Strong beliefs can carry us through difficult tasks and difficult times. Weak and ineffective beliefs, on the other hand, can bring failure and disappointment over and over again.

Yes, beliefs matter a great deal, especially when it comes to effective parenting. Few jobs will ever be more important that this one.

Empowering Beliefs

According to our guest on this program, Dr. Lynn Wicker, author of Raising Kids That Succeed, parents that feel empowered and confident in their beliefs as parents will more often see those beliefs contribute powerfully to the success of their children. In fact, Dr. Wicker will share evidence of this truth based on an eye-opening survey she conducted.

Raising Kids That Succeed

Parents that believe they are empowered to raise successful sons and daughters also parent with intent. Dr. Wicker will encourage listeners by sharing how success as a parent comes from day-to-day intent and purpose to fulfill that vital role.

Dr. Lynn Wicker

Raising Kids That Succeed, Dr. Lynn WickerA certified speaker, trainer and success coach, Dr. Wicker has 30 years of experience in public education, where she has held leadership positions in K-12 and higher education, including the directorship of a developmental research school. Dr. Wicker’s passion and purpose in life is to inspire individuals to find their own success and live their lives with purpose. The full title of her book, the one we are featuring on this program, is Raising Kids That Succeed: How to Help Your Kids Overcome Life’s Limitations and Think Their Way to Lifelong Success. (25:44)

www.LynnWicker.com

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BONUS: Dr. Wicker offers a complimentary download of the introduction and first chapter of Raising Kids That Succeed. [link]

Clearing Out the Clutter: Family Organization Pays Off (Guest: Alison Kero)

The Changing Behavior Network, The Speakers GroupWelcome to this informative program, “Clearing Out the Clutter: Family Organization Pays Off.”

Alison Kero, Clearning Out the Clutter, ACK OrganizingWhat pops into your thoughts when you consider the word “clutter?” Could it be a garage that contains anything you could possibly want except your car? Or how about a dozen near-empty paint cans holding colors you don’t like that have dried up years ago? Or what about the closet of good clothes that are being crushed by an overflow of things you will never wear again?

Clutter is Common

Truth is, the vast majority of us are living with clutter in our lives right now, and we probably don’t fully realize what it’s costing us. Perhaps it’s time we DO take a look at it. Perhaps it’s even time to get organized and not only feel better about it, but set the right example for our children.

Clutter Has Many Faces

Alison Kero, ACK Organizing. Conquering Emotional ClutterAccording to our guest on this program, declutter expert Alison Kero, clutter in our lives is more than an overflowing garage, old paint cans or the stuffed-beyond-belief closet. Clutter can affect us in other ways. It can  have an existential, spiritual quality or it can have emotional characteristics that are overwhelming. Indeed, clutter has many faces. Alison will help us take a look at it, and she will offer suggestions for decluttering our lives as well as our life space. We and our families will be the better for it.

Alison Kero

Alison’s business, ACK! Organizing, had its beginnings in 2004, as it grew from her own search for ways to more easily get and stay organized. She soon learned that self-love was a huge decision-making tool that helped her, and ultimate her clients, to create the best possible living space filled only with what they liked, used and needed. Alison’s expertise as an organization and productivity expert has been shared on broadcast and internet media and publications, including the Dr. Oz Show, CBS Morning News, The Mike Huckabee Show, The New York Times, US News and World Report, Manilla.com and numerous blogs. (27:05)

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Link as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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BONUS: Alison prepared this article especially for The Changing Behavior Network. It’s entitled, “How to Gain Happiness, Health & Productivity Through Organizing.” [link]

 

Straight Talk about Learning Disabilities, Part 1 (Guest: Laura Reiff)

The subjectLaura Reiff, Straight Talk About Learning Disabilities, learning disabilities, special education of learning disabilities can bring as many questions as answers. What are they, and how do children and teens “get” learning disabilities? What do parents and students need to know about learning disabilities, and what happens after a youngster is diagnosed? What are the responsibilities of the school to students diagnosed with learning disabilities, how are identified students to be taught, and how is progress measured and documented? In other words, what is the straight talk about learning disabilities?

And what about behavior? Does the child or teen with a learning disability ever present emotional or behavioral issues? If so how are they best addressed?

These are all good questions. Laura Reiff, our guest on this program will assist us in removing some of the mystery associated with learning disabilities, and she’ll replace it with insights gained from years of teaching learning disabled students.

The Adventures of Naomi Noodles, Laura ReiffSome insights might surprise you. For instance, did you know that many learning disabled students are quite bright? Did you know that federal law directs the effective education of children and teens diagnosed with learning disabilities?

Laura has a heart for helping students and their families to better understand learning disabilities and to lift what can be a negative stigma associated with Special Education. As a coach, guide and consultant, she operates a special website (posted below) that supports the needs and concerns of parents of children with learning disabilities. Laura is also involved in the writing of children’s books that help youngsters better understand learning disabilities and how they are addressed. Her first project, The Adventures of Naomi Noodles, is a book about a young girl coping with learning disabilities. (23:50)

www.about-special-education.com

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Becoming BETTER! Healthy Habits That Change Lives and Families

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75What if you were asked, “What’s the greatest gift you could give your family?” Although responses to that question would vary, folks would tend to agree that one great gift would be an improved, better version of yourself. Becoming better and being healthy, vibrant and fully involved in the lives of our children would be quite a gift to top. How to develop those healthy habits is precisely the topic of this program.

Terry Lancaster, healthy habits, becoming better, BETTER! Self Help for the Rest of UsListen in as our guest, Terry Lancaster, suggests how elaborate goals for activities like losing weight or working out are often doomed to fail. Terry’s philosophy, grounded in “been there” experience, is quite simple: We don’t have to become the best; we need only to focus on becoming BETTER.

From small starts backed by rock-solid consistency, we can achieve very worthwhile goals and habits, and we can feel great as we accomplish them. Terry is here to help us get a good handle on the sort of change that builds over time … and stays.

Terry Lancaster, BETTER! Self Help for the Rest of UsFair Warning: Healthy, life-lifting habits can be contagious! The research is clear on how our children tend to follow the paths we take.

Terry Lancaster is a speaker and an entrepreneur with a background in journalism. He writes and speaks on the power of habit and focus, helping folks to build better lives, better careers and better families, one minor adjustment, one focused action, one better habit at a time. Terry is the author of, BETTER! Self Help for the Rest of Us, the book we’re featuring on this program. (29:59)

http://TerryLancaster.com

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BONUS: CLICK HERE to download the first chapter of BETTER! Self Help for the Rest of Us, and to receive a 25% discount on the purchase of the book.

 

Childhood Trauma: Helping Youngsters Recover (Guest: Christy Monson)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75This excellent interview with Christy Monson was featured under a slightly different title on April 6, 2014. Unaddressed, the effects of childhood trauma can be substantial. Christy has some great insight on the issues affecting the traumatized child, and how we can help these youngsters recover more quickly and more effectively. -JDS

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Christy Monson, childhood trauma, the traumatized childHow does one explain and process tragedy, trauma and loss to a child? Although youngsters have the ability to handle these circumstances as well as most adults, how we help and support them certainly matters.

In this program, Christy Monson, will share her insights and interventions for recognizing the behaviors and reactions of the tragedy-affected youngster and how we can help the grieving, traumatized and hurting child heal with our love and support. As Christy will explain, our role in helping this child stabilize and recover is a very important one.

Love, Hugs and Hope, When Scary Things Happen, Christy MonsonAn experienced Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Christy built a very successful counseling practice in Nevada and later in Utah. She is the author of Love, Hugs and Hope: When Scary Things Happen. This book for children is the focus of this program.

Christy has authored other books, also, including the soon-to-be released, The Family Council Guidebook: How to Solve Problems and Strengthen Relationships.

www.ChristyMonson.com

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Real Conversation with Your Teen: Make it a New Norm (Dr. Laurie Hollman)

real conversation, Laurie Hollman, talking to teensThe next time you talk to your teen, notice how often he or you share your attention with your smart phone. How long can you talk without an intervening text? What is the impact of these diversions on your parent-teen relationship? What might be the value of real conversation?

Remember …?
Remember the day your daughter came home with a dismal look on her face? Head down, she walked right past you without much of a hello while glancing at a text on her phone. Did you think to question what that dismal expression meant or were you deterred by her texting or your own phone ringing? How many days passed before you found out her boyfriend had just broken up with her and she felt lost and alone?

Remember when your son threw down his backpack as he marched into the house? Except for the cell phone in his hand, the silence toward you plus his grim exterior suggested he had abandoned all traces of connections with others. He raced upstairs and you didn’t see him until you called three times that dinner was ready.

When he said he wasn’t hungry, you got a text from your husband that he’d be late and so you ate alone while texting your friend. How many days passed before you were informed by email from a teacher that your son was failing both English and math, the news that silenced him that day and made him lose his appetite.

Heed the Warning
When texting is primary and talking is secondary, heed the warning that you and your teen are growing distant. You can blame the smart phone, but be a smart parent and call a halt to this progression. Talking to teens requires all your attention.

real conversation, Unlocking Parental Intelligence, Laurie Hollman, talking to teensThis doesn’t mean moving in like an army captain to take away your kid’s phone. After all, you’re also carrying out the same smart phone diversion tactics interfering with your relationship. It does mean giving your child your full attention when needed, not googling for more data about what’s being discussed. It does mean having real conversations without interruptions. Stop googling and start talking!

8 Tips for Real Conversation

1. Put your cell phone far away. The very presence of the phone may change the tone and content of the conversation.
2. Maintain eye contact. This means you are fully present with complete attention.
3. If you’re getting bored and have that cell phone urge, listen more carefully and closely to what is being said and respond in kind.
4. Keep your mind in the present, not diverted elsewhere if the image of your phone comes to mind.
5. If you feel the desire to go find your phone and not stay in the conversation, consider that what’s being discussed is a bit disturbing. All the more reason for a parent to stay in the conversation with your teen! Maybe you are about to hear something distressing but important.
6. If you miss your phone, it’s a clue you have just lost empathy toward your teen. Why would you choose your phone over your child? Something’s off and you need to attend to your feelings.
7. Real conversation without interruption builds bonds because it fosters connections. It’s like hugging with words when you really listen to your teen.
8. Now make face-to-face conversation a priority. Engage your teen at least once a day for at least ten to twenty minutes. It will be rewarding because you will understand your child better and your child will feel he or she is loveable to you.

As parents, we owe it to our kids to keep phones away from the dinner table, the living room, and the car. They deserve to be listened to with our full attention. The time is now to make real conversation the new norm. ###

Laurie Hollman, PhD, [website] is a psychoanalyst with a new book, Unlocking Parental Intelligence: Finding Meaning in Your Child’s Behavior, on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Familius and wherever books are sold.