Winter: A Time for Introspection and Renewal (Dr. Daniel Trussell)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs the dark nights seem to stretch forever and days are cold, still and short, Winter is a time for reflection. It’s the perfect opportunity to fine tune desires, goals and accomplishments planned for in the coming year. Winter offers a time for refreshment and renewal as outdoor activities, social functions and overburdened schedules slow down to create a less frenzied routine.

With less hectic schedules, fewer time constraints and reduced daily routine, we find more time to reflect on the past: lessons learned, accomplishments gained and new strategies for “getting it right this time.”

 

snow, snow days, winter is a time for reflection, winter renewal

Families spend more time indoors together, providing the gift of time to spend with one another. Opportunities abound for increased intimacy, improved communication and the intentional making of positive memories with one another.

Yet many of us fail to embrace this auspicious time of year that encourages us to look inward, feast on the harvest of experience the preceding seasons provided and foment plans to increase engagement, meaning and positive relationships.

Snow Days as Grow Days
My wish for families I interact with during the Winter is that they will have several snow days – those days when everything shuts down, kids can’t get to school, parents can’t get to work and there is general quiet and beauty. Of course, in my vision, there are no disasters to contend with, the heat and lights stay on and a deep blanket of pristine snow covers the driveways and highways, inviting play and merriment.

Dr. Daniel TrussellBut what happens during snow days? Kids may go off on their own, parents worry about not getting work done and there may be a general sense of restlessness, boredom or dread.

However, snow days can provide a unique set of circumstances that gathers the family in one place at the same time. It’s the perfect time to hold a family meeting, learn a new skill, begin a family project or foster family bonds through creating positive memories, engaging in positive family activities and improving relationships.

A little planning now for those snow days can help structure activities that promote better family well-being and put every family member on notice that a snow day is a grow day.

While the promise of renewal lies shortly ahead when trees leaf out, daffodils bloom and the first Spring crops emerge, Winter is truly a time to celebrate. Take advantage of this Winter to not only plan for the future but to review the past and change the present. You are in charge of creating the future you want to have. Winter is the springboard. ###

 

Daniel Trussell, Ph.D., MBA, LPC, NCC, CPCS is author of The How Families Flourish Workbook and How Families Flourish. He is a certified Professional Counselor supervisor and conducts training for both professionals and families in incorporating the findings from positive psychology into daily life. He can be reached at drdanieltrussell@gmail.com. [website]

 

The Power of Curiosity (Guest: Kirsten Siggins)

BTRadioInt-300x75Milton Wright brought a simple flying toy home to his curious sons, Wilbur and Orville. The rest, of course, is history; we now ride the skies on the wings of the power of curiosity. Curious people are movers and shakers because … well, because it’s both their calling and their destiny.

the power of curiosity, conflict resolution, improving relationshipsCuriosity can be a powerful component in relationships, also. It can add to the depth of relating with and understanding others. Skillfully used, curiosity can help us resolve conflicts and restore harmony.

Having and using a tool like curiosity can serve us well. In conflict resolution, curiosity can help us open a conversation we might otherwise prefer to avoid. Whether its with a co-worker, spouse or a child, we can learn to take the coercion out of conflict and the conflict out of relationships. Kirsten Siggins, an executive coach skilled in using curiosity in leadership development, is with us on this program to help us grasp and use the power of curiosity.

the power of curiosity, conflict resolution, improving relationshipsKirsten suggests we are no strangers to curiosity; we had plenty of it as children. Using curiosity well involves relearning what we already know, and she will help us do precisely that. The benefit: relationships that remain close.

Kirsten is quite passionate about working with parents and teens, sharing the curiosity skills for improving relationships as they stay curious and connected in all conversations. Kirsten and her mother, Kathy Taberner, also an executive coach, founded the Institute of Curiosity, a successful and much-publicized coaching and training organization built on the qualities of curiosity. Today, we are featuring their new book, The Power of Curiosity: How To Have Real Conversations That Create Collaboration, Innovation and Understanding. (25:40)

http://www.instituteofcuriosity.com (The Intro and Chapter One of The Power of Curiosity is available for free at this website.)

 

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Link as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Father Hunger: Needing a Father’s Love (Keith Zafren)

a father's love, father hunger, psychological effects of father absenceFather Hunger is a phrase many psychologists, authors and poets use to describe the universal and life-long yearning children have for a father’s love and involvement. Sometimes loving dads satisfy that hunger. Other children continue to yearn when their need is not met by engaged fathers. Some starve for lack of fathering.

Psychological Effects of Father Absence

Fatherlessness leaves children hungering—craving for dad’s affection, affirmation, and loving presence. Father hungry children tend not to grow up to be healthy, well-adjusted and happy adults. A host of studies link fatherless to many serious social problems. Children from fatherless homes account for:

63 percent of youth suicides
71 percent of pregnant teenagers
90 percent of all homeless and runaway children
70 percent of juveniles in state-operated institutions
85 percent of all youth who exhibit behavior disorders
80 percent of rapists motivated with displaced anger
71 percent of all high school dropouts
75 percent of all adolescents in chemical abuse centers
85 percent of all youths sitting in prison.[i]

father's love, father hunger, psychological effects of father absenceResearchers Frank Furstenberg and Kathleen Harris reveal that more important than a father’s presence or even his living at home is how close a child feels to his or her father. That feeling of closeness, they argue, is most predictably associated with positive life outcomes for the child even twenty-five years later. Based on these findings, Dr. Kyle Pruett notes, “Children who feel a closeness to their father are twice as likely as those who do not to enter college or find stable employment after high school, 75 percent less likely to have a teen birth, 80 percent less likely to spend time in jail, and half as likely to experience multiple depression symptoms.”[ii]

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association in the mid 1990s confirmed that “doing lots of activities together is not the crucial variable in the relationship between parent and child; rather, it is a sense of connectedness.”[iii]

Satisfying the Hunger

Ultimately, it’s how close a child feels to their dad that makes all the difference as to how satisfied their hunger. If you’re a dad, that means that your focus ought to be, as much and as often as possible, and as intentionally as you can focus, on creating that feeling of closeness with your kids.

May our children never go hungry, as some of us did.

Great Dads Shape Great Kids.
Be a Great Dad Today.
________________________________________
[i]Reported in John Sowers, Fatherless Generation: Redeeming the Story (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2010), 36-37.
[ii] Cited in Kyle D. Pruett M.D., Fatherneed: Why Father Care Is as Essential as Mother Care for Your Child (New York: Broadway Books, 2000), 38.
[iii] Cited in Gail Sheehy, Understanding Men’s Passages: Discovering the New Map of Men’s Lives (New York: Balllantine Books, 1998), 166.

Post by Keith Zafren, founder of The Great Dads Project and author of the award-winning book, How to Be a Great Dad—No Matter What Kind of Father You Had.

Men who want to be great dads love the stories Keith Zafren tells, the practical skills he teaches, and the personal coaching he offers. Keith has spent seventeen years learning firsthand how to raise three great teenagers and stay close to them, no matter what. He coaches busy dads not to repeat the mistakes their fathers made, but instead, to create fantastic relationships with their kids. Check out his free Great Dad Video Training.

Raising Confident, Happy Kids, Part Two (Guest: Jonathan Hewitt)

BTRadioInt-300x75Parents want t0 have happy kids, of course. But descriptions of “happy” can vary widely. Folks like author Dennis Prager (Happiness is a Serious Problem) have been telling us for years how there can be serious issues with how we chase after happiness, and how we try to capture it for our children.

JonathanHewittphotoJonathan Hewitt, our guest on this program, takes another giant step in exposing something that is hurting our kids; he calls it the American Happiness Formula. Here it is: Look Good + Perform Well + Get Approval = Happiness. As a result of dependence on “outside” measures of accomplishment and success, our children are showing more stress, anxiety and depression than ever before. In a refeshingly candid fashion, Jonathan shares from personal experience the harm the American Happiness Formula can create in young people and their families.

Image of Happy KidsFortunately, there is hope, and Jonathan offers plenty of it. His training, extensive research and experience in psychology, martial arts and life education have led to some welcomed answers. In this in-depth, two-part interview, Jonathan outlines a formula for happiness that emphasizes increased focus, confidence, resilience and social intelligence.

Jonathan and his wife, Lana, teach their “growth from within” principles to young people at their Life Ki-do Academy in Austin, Texas. Their success over the years has been remarkable. The Hewitts have now shared with parents what they’ve learned and what they teach. It’s in their new book, Life Ki-do Parenting: Tools to Raise Happy, Confident Kids from the Inside Out. (25:19)

www.lifekido.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Raising Confident, Happy Kids, Part One (Guest: Jonathan Hewitt)

BTRadioInt-300x75Parents want happy kids, of course. But descriptions of “happy” can vary widely. Folks like author Dennis Prager (Happiness is a Serious Problem) have been telling us for years how there can be serious issues with how we chase after happiness, and how we try to capture it for our children.

JonathanHewittphotoJonathan Hewitt, our guest on this program, takes another giant step in exposing something that is hurting our kids; he calls it the American Happiness Formula. Here it is: Look Good + Perform Well + Get Approval = Happiness. As a result of dependence on “outside” measures of accomplishment and success, our children are showing more stress, anxiety and depression than ever before. In a refeshingly candid fashion, Jonathan shares from personal experience the harm the American Happiness Formula can create in young people and their families.

Hewitt_cover_withEndorsement.inddFortunately, there is hope, and Jonathan offers plenty of it. His training, extensive research and experience in psychology, martial arts and life education have led to some welcomed answers. In this in-depth, two-part interview, Jonathan outlines a formula for happiness that emphasizes increased focus, confidence, resilience and social intelligence.

Jonathan and his wife, Lana, teach their “growth from within” principles to young people at their Life Ki-do Academy in Austin, Texas. Their success over the years has been remarkable. The Hewitts have now shared with parents what they’ve learned and what they teach. It’s in their new book, Life Ki-do Parenting: Tools to Raise Happy, Confident Kids from the Inside Out. (22:10)

www.lifekido.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Make Memories: Work and Play with Your Family (Christy Monson)

CMonsonphotoThis past summer, my husband and I hosted a reunion of his childhood cousins. As kids, these wonderful people loved being together. Some of their families lived in Idaho and some in central California. The parents made a special effort to spend time with extended family, even though they didn’t live close. Every summer the cousins worked together on one farm or another, weeding, feeding livestock and irrigating.

Eventually everyone grew up and went their separate ways. They became doctors, international business men, teachers, and engineers in many walks of life. They saw each other at weddings and funerals, if their busy schedules permitted.

As they reached retirement age, they felt the need to reconnect. At the reunion this summer, they spent three wonderful days reminiscing and getting reacquainted with each other.

Family Talk BookSome of the memories they shared were of a crabby uncle, but most of the stories were told about work and play with hard-driving parents, struggling to eke out a living. No one focused on the barn being full of hay or the price of the potatoes each year. They remembered the time they spent together, filling the irrigation ditches, chasing an errant calf or eating pancakes until they were about to burst.

They talked about the ball games they won, the horses they rode, and the pranks they played on each other. Their reminiscence was about the pleasure they experienced in interacting with each other as kids—their communication and relationships.

Focus on the journey, not the destination. Joy is found not in finishing an activity, but in doing it.

Greg Anderson

 

The parents of these cousins are not with us anymore, but here are some of the principles we can take away from their child-rearing practices:

1. Spend time with your kids
2. Work and play together
3. Give them a sense of family
4. Enjoy your extended family

 

Most of us don’t have to fill the irrigation ditches or milk the cows anymore. Life has changed. But we can still build relationships with our children through work and play.

A happy family is but an earlier heaven.

George Bernard Shaw

 

As adults what do you remember of your youth? What memories mean the most to you? ###

Christy Monson has an M.S. in Counseling Psychology and Marriage & Family Therapy from University of Nevada at Las Vegas, and established a successful counseling practice in Las Vegas, Nevada. Check out her informative website [link].

 

Envy: Learning to Manage a Powerful Emotion as We Grow (Dr. Josh Gressel)

BTRadioInt-300x75Envy is a valid emotion, yet no one seems to want to claim it. At least that’s the way it appears. Consequently, we might try to hide envy as best we can, yet it often causes us trouble.

So why is one of the Seven Deadly Sins and the subject of one of the Ten Commandments such a mystery? What is envy, and what do we do about it? That’s the topic of this program.

JGresselphotoOur guest on this program, psychologist Dr. Josh Gressel, describes envy as “the neglected emotional stepchild of our inner world.” Managing issues of envy as they affect adults, children, teens and families involves having a “new experience with an old problem.” In the process, we can learn to embrace the emotion as we do the others, while we take a step at becoming even more capable of dealing with life as it comes.

In this interview, Dr. Gressel discusses with Dr. Sutton not only how envy can be identified and addressed, but how it can have faces that are easy to miss. It’s not just the envy of others that causes struggle; the inciting of envy can create pr0blems. Then there’s the youngster or adult who deliberately performs less than their best for fear them might be envied. How costly might that be?

JGresselbookListen in, also, as the subject of “shadenfreude” is discussed. We have no word for it in English, but perhaps we should. Shadenfreude is the practice of finding joy in the misfortune of others, especially when they tumble from high places.

This program just might have you saying, “Yeah … I never thought of it that way, but it really makes sense!”

Josh Gressel is a clinical psychologist practicing in the San Francisco Bay area. He is a student of Jewish mysticism and seeks to integrate spiritual and psychological truths in his work with patients. He’s the author of the book we are featuring on this program. The title of this work is, Embracing Envy: Finding the Spiritual Treasure in Our Most Shameful Emotion. (29:05)

http://www.joshgressel.com

To download a free article from Dr. Gressel entitled, “Five Things to Do When You Feel Envious,” CLICK HERE or go to the Free Articles from Our Experts tab above.

 

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Link as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

The Harder You Work, The Bigger the Snowman (Michael Byron Smith)

There is no school equal to a decent home and no teacher equal to a virtuous parent.

Mahatma Gandhi

It starts around October. People, almost exclusively adults, start complaining about the onset of winter. I understand their point of view. Their focus centers on being cold, dealing with icy roads and often dreary weather. I don’t like those things either, but not enough to worry or complain about them.

Few of us have to be in the cold air longer than it takes to walk from our toasty car to our toasty home or office, at least not often. Slippery roads are a nuisance, but where I live in the Midwest, there may be only 10-15 days all winter when the roads are seriously snowy or icy for part of a day. In more northern states, they really know how to deal with their more frequent snowy days and they do it efficiently. There isn’t much you can do about dreary days, but I’ve seen dreary days in every season. With those realities said, I believe any adult that doesn’t like winter has the right to complain about it or move to a warmer climate. But it is also my opinion that children who are raised in areas that have seasons are advantaged in experiences and learning.

Cardinal in WInterNow I admit that winter comes in last in my list of favorite seasons. Spring, fall, summer, then winter is how I rank the seasons. But I LOVE seasons! In winter, I thoroughly enjoy watching the snow fall while I sit by a fire. And there is certainly beauty in winter if simply a red cardinal resting on a branch with a snowy background.

One of my favorite sensations ever was at my farmhouse in the country, waking in the morning after a heavy snowfall had blanketed the earth the night before. The wind was completely still in the bright morning sunshine. I walked outside and it was the most profound silence I have ever experienced. It was as if the snow had muffled every possible sound, except the squeaky sound of my boots sinking in the snow. The scene was truly a Norman Rockwell painting.

I accept winter and look for those experiences that only winter can provide. This brings me back to children. You rarely hear them complain about winter. They pray for snow and run around outside so much they don’t get cold. When they come in, a little hot chocolate will put the exclamation point on a fun and memorable kid experience. I have many memories of playing outside with friends, coming in with my hands so numb that the cold water from the tap felt warm, and I loved it!

You can join in the fun with them. Have a snowball fight or take them on a hike in the woods. The exercise and cooler weather make it comfortable and invigorating with views no longer obstructed with leaves. And you can sneak in a few life lessons occasionally using tricky little metaphors that may stick with them longer than a boring lecture.

Teachable Moments in Winter
Build a snowman with your children. Maybe you can have a competition for the best snowman. The teachable moment may be, ‘the more you work on your snowman the bigger and better he will be–just like anything else you will ever do’. But working hard isn’t the entire answer to success. You have to work smart also. It’s impossible to make a good snowman with very dry snow, even if you work very hard at it. With a little patience, a warmer sunny day will melt the snow wet enough to be able to build your snowman. The teachable moment: Patience and smarts will often save you a lot of time and effort with better results.

Go sledding with your children. Find a nice long hill and feel the thrill of zooming down. If they want to ride down again, they will have to trudge up the hill. The first ride down is free, after that they will have to work to experience it again. Going down is easy. Going up is work! The teachable moment: Nothing worthwhile is really free. There is always effort required by someone. The only ones who sled down for free are those that don’t have the strength and need the help of others to get back on top. Which of those would you rather be?

Not only are there life lessons to teach, but there are science lessons that will be remembered when they are in school. Take your children ice skating. Skating is best when there is very little friction, allowing them to glide effortlessly. But when they need to stop, they want some of that friction back so they dig into the ice. Friction is like fire. It can save your life or ruin it. How people use it makes all the difference!

Some history lessons can be best expressed in the winter. The strength of our forefathers and ancestors can be demonstrated, when there were no furnaces to warm them up with a push of a button; or when their home was a teepee or mud hut. No snowplows helped them out. Grocery stores were rarely nearby and food had to be grown or hunted. Traveling for just thirty miles would take half a day or more and the only heat was from the horse if you were lucky enough to have one. Not until one thinks about how tough conditions were for others in the past will they understand and appreciate the fortune they have today.

But maybe the most important of all these moments, whether you stop to teach or not, is to be actively engaged with your children, having fun, creating everlasting memories, and making connections to them that will serve both you and them forever. I already mentioned a couple of winter activities, but there are others you can enjoy with your kids including baking things together, movie nights, reading books, crafts, snowball fights, going to sporting events, and so much more.

Take advantage of every opportunity
I wish everyone a great winter season! Make the best of every day no matter the season, and never miss a chance for a teachable moment for your children. And for you older folks out there who hate winter, just think about how fast time passes for us! It’ll be spring before you know it; the recent contrast of winter causing it to be even more appreciated. I can almost see the tulips and crocuses popping through the ground already. Another teachable moment! ###

Article and photographs by Michael Byron Smith, author of The Power of Dadhood [website]
“Helping Fathers to be Dads” blog

 

Compassion Fatigue: Healing the Healer (Guest: Loren Gelberg-Goff)

BTRadioIntCompassion is a good quality for any person to have. But too much compassion for too long can cause one to become dejected and weary. It can even make folks sick as it takes a toll on persons of high purpose and intent.

LorenGphotoWhen a person is a caregiver of others, either as a family member or as a profession, there will always be a risk for compassion fatigue. It’s a condition affecting good people, and, when children and grandchildren are in the home, how we deal with it is on display. How do we recognize the symptoms of compassion fatigue, and how is it managed and treated, or, if possible, avoided? Our guest on this program, author and psychotherapist Loren Gelberg-Goff, will help us with answers to these very important questions and concerns.

LGGbookAs a licensed clinical socialworker, Loren operates a thriving private practice in which she supports and encourages individuals to live their lives authentically empowered and fulfilled. She also provides training and keynotes on related topics of work and family balance, managing anger, dealing with stress, and expressing forgiveness, just to list a few. Loren is the co-author of the book, Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed. (The other co-author is Carmel-Ann Mania, also a health service professional.) (26:31)

http://www.beingwellwithin.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Visioneering: A Great Tool for Launching Great Kids (Peggy Caruso)

Visualization is also known as visual guided imagery. This technique uses the imagination to slow down chatter of the mind and reduce negative thoughts and worries. This exercise plants the seed for a life full of goals and aspirations. Once you look at things you desire and affix them in your mind, it helps the manifestation process. And children are so creative that it is great fun.

Daydreaming is a Good Thing

peggyVisualization is one of the greatest keys to success. We were taught as children not to daydream, but in reality dreaming is what transforms our goals into reality and makes us better people. Daydreaming or visualization helps children process information and explore ideas. There have been substantial studies that connect daydreaming in children with creativity, healthy social adjustment and good academic performance. A social component is associated with the visualization process, which enhances social skills and creates empathy within the child.

Seeing words on the screen of your mind is what makes the words come to life. Think about that. The visioneering process is so much easier for children in the developmental stages of their lives. It not only teaches them to be tactical thinkers, but also assists them in relaxing, exercising, showing gratitude and laughing. Visualization can help children with ADD/ADHD, which places them in a state of stress. Hyperactive and impulsive children don’t know how to relax. I make hypnotherapy tapes for my ADD/ADHD clients, and the results are amazing. It helps them be calm, which then allows them to become emotionally involved in the visioneering process.

Relaxation Techniques

Dreaming and visualizing assist children and adults with relaxation techniques.

Breathe! Breathing slows down your heart rate, increases blood flow, improves concentration, reduces pain, boosts confidence and reduces anger. Whether children or adults encounter negative emotions, such as fear, worry or doubt, relating to anxiety, stress, testing, confidence boosters, and so on, learning breathing techniques will help eliminate that negative outcome.

The following are two different techniques. The first one is the hypnotic relaxation technique: Take a deep breath—breathe in really deep and hold it as long as you can, then release it slowly through your mouth. Repeat it three times. This will begin the calming process.

The second one is the Jacobsen technique, which is a muscle relaxation technique: Tense your arms/hands, hold five to seven seconds, then relax; next, tense your face/head, hold five to seven seconds, then relax; next, tense your chest/shoulders/stomach, hold five to seven seconds, then relax; and, last, tense your legs/feet, hold five to seven seconds, then relax.

• Muscle relaxation for smaller children: There are multiple relaxation techniques: hypnosis, massage therapy, tai chi and yoga. Some techniques require you to use both visual imagery and body awareness. For instance, when you are striving to reduce stress, you would use an autogenic relaxation technique in which you repeat words or suggestions to relax and reduce muscle tension.

Exercise: This one is easy because all children love to jump, run, walk, dance, swim and, most important, play! Encourage teens to join a gym or exercise program.

Laugh!  Tell jokes, funny stories, make silly faces or watch cartoons. Watch a comedy together with teens. Bring laughter into the family life. Just spend quality time listening and laughing with your children.

Play with your pet. Pets are wonderful and are known to lower their owners’ blood pressure and reduce stress. They bring much laughter to families. Also, laugh at each other. Do something silly to make your children laugh. You can do this from infancy through the teenage years. You could purchase a funny poster to hang in their room or choose a funny screensaver for the computer. Remember: Laughter releases happy endorphins in your brain.

Listen to music: Choose those with encouraging lyrics and good dancing. This is powerful at all ages. As I previously mentioned, just ensure proper lyrics.

Meditate: At bedtime, teach your children to close their eyes, picture something wonderful about the day, and breathe slowly. Have them snuggle their favorite stuffed animal in the process. Teens and adults can also meditate by thinking of something happy and positive such as a goal or vision. Have them picture it as if it has already happened. Calmness of mind is very important and learning how to meditate will benefit them throughout the day.

PCarusocoverEducate your child on the focus of positivity. Keep them focused with concentration of happy thoughts and make them aware of the detriments to negative thoughts. Negative thoughts are unhealthy.

With your teenager or yourself, try to make quality time in the evening because the last forty-five minutes before bed are essential in the thought process. We need to incorporate these relaxation techniques as adults. Relaxation and meditation are essential to the daily routine for you or your child. Doing them together with your child, at any age, promotes good health and quality family bonding and supports creativity.

Creative imagination, auto suggestion and all self-administered stimuli which reach one’s mind through the five senses is the agency of communication between that part of the mind where conscious thought takes place and that which serves as the seat of action for the subconscious mind. No thought can enter the subconscious mind without the aid of the principle of autosuggestion.

Creative imagination is the receiving set of the brain. Utilizing your senses with creative imagination helps it to become a reality. You are like a radio receiving station, whereas you can tune in to whatever you like, happiness or sadness, success or failure, optimism or fear.

Remember the power of visualization. It is truly part of the creative process. ###

Peggy Caruso can be reached at pcaruso@lifecoaching.comcastbiz.net for more information. www.lifecoachingandbeyond.com