Tag Archives: hope

Five String Recovery, Part 2 (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

A 16-year-old musician wins a national bluegrass championship while secretly battling addiction. Here’s the second of his two-part story about his recovery, his music, and his message to young people.

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Five String Recovery, Phillip WadlowThis is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now, but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Five String Recovery, Part 1 (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

A 16-year-old musician wins a national bluegrass championship while secretly battling addiction. Here’s his two-part story about his recovery, his music, and his message to young people.

…………………………….

Five String Recovery, Phil Wadlow, The Changing Behavior Network

If you take a Missouri boy who grew up with bluegrass music and encourage his natural talent for playing it well, you’ll have the ingredients for an awesome career very few can achieve.

Young Phillip Wadlow was that Missouri boy. Everything was falling into place for him, until drugs and alcohol threatened to destroy him and all he held dear. This is his story and his music, in two parts. This interview was recorded in May of 1990, as Phil was completing his first year of recovery and sobriety. It’s a story Phil wants young people to hear, for he hopes they can learn from the wrong turns he took.Five String Recovery, Phillip Wadlow

In this part, Part One, Phil shares how he began using marijuana at a very young age, and how so quickly its use became chronic. But Phil also shares about the music he grew up with and how, at 16, he won a national bluegrass championship. He plays the song that took first place, “Cattle in the Cane.” The joy of being recognized for his music, however, was tainted by the fact he was, by then, completely dependent upon his drug of choice.

Dr. Sutton, the host in this interview, picks up his guitar and accompanies Phil on most of the songs in both parts on the interview. The banjo solo at the opening is an original composition of Phil’s, “Dusty Roads.” (22:12)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file, right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE.


(START/STOP Audio)

Identifying and Cultivating Your Child’s Core Strengths (Dr. Daniel Trussell)

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(Email subscribers: Go to the website to see the many “freebies” offered by our guest experts and to listen to radio-style interviews on the podcast player.)

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Most parents want to help develop their child’s strengths but don’t know where to start. It can be overwhelming to determine what your child’s strengths are and then to set up experiences where your child is challenged to activate those strengths.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWhen I ask parents to describe their child’s strengths, I get answers like, “He’s good at getting his way,” or “She excels in soccer” or “He’s a natural artist.” While these are all skills worth cultivating, I want to challenge you to think differently about strengths. In their landmark book, Character Strengths and Virtues ( Oxford University Press, 2004), Peterson and Seligman developed a taxonomy of universal virtues and the strengths associated with each of those six virtues.

Six Virtues
The six virtues found in all cultures include Wisdom, Courage, Humanity Justice, Temperance and Transcendence.

Acting on these virtues not only defines an individual as living a superior life, but also leads to greater life satisfaction both individually and collectively.

Strengths
Peterson and Seligman assigned different strengths that embody each of the universal virtues. They are listed below.

Wisdom and Knowledge— acquiring and using knowledge

Creativity

Curiosity

Judgement and critical thinking

Love of learning

Perspective

 

Courage— accomplishing goals in the face of opposition

Bravery

Persistence

Integrity

Vitality

 

Humanity— strengths of befriending and tending to others

Love

Generosity

Social and emotional intelligence

 

Justice–strengths that build community

Teamwork

Fairness

Leadership

 

Temperance–strengths that protect against excess

Forgiveness and mercy

Humility

Prudence

Self-control

 

Transcendence— strengths that connect us to the larger universe

Appreciation of beauty

Gratitude

Hope

Humor

Spirituality

 

While some of these strengths become evident in the first years of life, others do not develop until adolescence. Although young children can express forgiveness, for example, it is almost always conditional and typically includes an element of revenge. It requires emotional and intellectual development, along with an abundance of life experience to be able to show mercy, forgiveness without revenge.  Young children can  tell jokes and be funny, but humor, the capacity to change another’s affect through bittersweet observation, is often not cultivated until much later in life.

Cultivating Core Strengths

To cultivate a child’s core strengths, that child must be exposed to activities that align with their strengths. No child will have all the virtues and strengths; a good rule of thumb is to determine the top five and the lowest five.  Plan abundant activities that allow a child to use their top strengths and limit activities that require use of their lowest strengths to maximize life satisfaction and general well-being.

If you child is high in appreciation of beauty, you could attend art exhibits, hike to beautiful places or find environments that allow her to get in touch with her appreciation and awe. Conversely, if your child is low in persistence, assign chores that don’t pay great attention to details.

To download a list of activities associated with each strength mentioned here, send me an email to drdanieltrussell@gmail.com or go to 264 Character Building Activities for Kids

 Daniel Trussell, Ph.D., LPC, NCC, CPCS is author of How Families Flourish, a parenting guide using the constructs of applied positive psychology. To learn more about his program go to http://www.howfamiliesflourish.com

 

Five-string Recovery, Part Two (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

This is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now, but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Five-string Recovery, Part One (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

If you take a Missouri boy who grew up with bluegrass music and encourage his natural talent for playing it well, you’ll have the ingredients for an awesome career very few can achieve.

Young Phillip Wadlow was that Missouri boy. Everything was falling into place for him, until drugs and alcohol threatened to destroy him and all he held dear. This is his story and his music, in two parts. This interview was recorded in May of 1990, as Phil was completing his first year of recovery and sobriety. It’s a story Phil wants young people to hear, for he hopes they can learn from the wrong turns he took.

In this part, Part One, Phil shares how he began using marijuana at a very young age, and how so quickly its use became chronic. But Phil also shares about the music he grew up with and how, at 16, he won a national bluegrass championship. He plays the song that took first place, “Cattle in the Cane.” The joy of being recognized for his music, however, was tainted by the fact he was, by then, completely dependent upon his drug of choice.

Dr. Sutton, the host in this interview, picks up his guitar and accompanies Phil on most of the songs in both parts on the interview. The banjo solo at the opening is an original composition of Phil’s, “Dusty Roads.” (22:12)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file, right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE.

COMING SOON: Five-string Recovery, Part Two (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

Growing Up Ziglar: Lessons Learned and Shared–Part Two (Guest: Julie Ziglar Norman)

Thirteen is a delicate age. It’s a transition out of childhood that brings with it enough challenges and adjustments. But what happens when you’re thirteen and you and your family move from South Carolina to the fast pace of Dallas, Texas? What happens when you never have a chance to say goodbye to your best friend, your horse? As what happens as your father, Zig Ziglar, is quickly becoming one of the most-popular and most-loved speakers on the planet?

Our guest today, Julie Ziglar Norman, shares these experiences in this candid and inspiring interview, but she she’s quick to point out that problems, challenges and heartaches didn’t stop when she (or anyone else) turned fourteen. As she shares her story, Julie makes it clear that, even with great parents and a close family, poor choices can bring on consequences that are difficult to bear. And, like so many young people, Julie was good at covering everything with a smile and a “I’m just fine” facade.

But she wasn’t fine, and that’s the message she wants parents and young people to hear. Julie shares how she addressed the poor choices she made, some of them years later. It wasn’t easy, but it was life-changing. Julie shares freely about how, for her, those changes were rooted in faith, forgiveness and practiced principles of Christianity.

Today Julie, like her dad, is an accomplished and sought-after speaker. She is the founder of Ziglar Women, a Christian ministry that encourages and empowers women. She is the author of Growing Up Ziglar: A Daughter’s Broken Journey from Heartache to Hope (published by Guideposts). (26:55)

www.julieziglarnorman.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON! Children Behaving Desperately: Insights and Interventions (Guest: Dr. James Sutton)

 

Growing Up Ziglar: Lessons Learned and Shared–Part One (Guest: Julie Ziglar Norman)

Thirteen is a delicate age. It’s a transition out of childhood that brings with it enough challenges and adjustments. But what happens when you’re thirteen and you and your family move from South Carolina to the fast pace of Dallas, Texas? What happens when you never have a chance to say goodbye to your best friend, your horse? As what happens as your father, Zig Ziglar, is quickly becoming one of the most-popular and most-loved speakers on the planet?

Our guest today, Julie Ziglar Norman, shares these experiences in this candid and inspiring interview, but she she’s quick to point out that problems, challenges and heartaches didn’t stop when she (or anyone else) turned fourteen. As she shares her story, Julie makes it clear that, even with great parents and a close family, poor choices can bring on consequences that are difficult to bear. And, like so many young people, Julie was good at covering everything with a smile and a “I’m just fine” facade.

But she wasn’t fine, and that’s the message she wants parents and young people to hear. Julie shares how she addressed the poor choices she made, some of them years later. It wasn’t easy, but it was life-changing. Julie shares freely about how, for her, those changes were rooted in faith, forgiveness and practiced  principles of Christianity.

Today Julie, like her dad, is an accomplished and sought-after speaker. She is the founder of Ziglar Women, a Christian ministry that encourages and empowers women.  She is the author of Growing Up Ziglar: A Daughter’s Broken Journey from Heartache to Hope (published by Guideposts). (26:25)

www.julieziglarnorman.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON! Growing Up Ziglar: Lessons Learned and Shared, Part Two Guest: Julie Ziglar Norman)

 

 

Serving Up Food and Hope in Seattle (Guest: John Howie)

Life can be difficult sometimes, but that’s no reason to quit. Our guest on this program, Chef John Howie, can identify with this message; he has lived it. John is also quick to point out that dreaming big, working hard, and not giving up are very much worth the effort.

John worked to support himself while still a boy of 15. With skills and responsibilities gained from caring for younger siblings, he quickly made a place for himself in the restaurant business. He ultimate became the executive chef of one of the most prestigious restaurants in the Pacific Northwest. He now heads John Howie Restaurant Group, which owns and operates five award-winning restaurants in and around the Seattle area.

John has never been one to take his success or the people working for him for granted.  He believes strongly in giving back, which is why he and his family are so involved in local charities and causes, especially those involving young people. John’s is a heartfelt message of encouragement and hope based upon authentic gratitude.

John and his restaurants have been praised by numerous media, including Food & Wine, Wine Spectator, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Sunset, Martha Stewart Living, The Early Show (CBS), CNN, Food Network and The Cooking Channel. John is the author of Passion and Palate: Recipies for a Generous Table. (This book contains John’s story, as well as 240 prize recipes with 88 full-color photos.) (26:43)

www.plankcooking.com
TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

5-String Recovery, Part Two (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

This is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now,  but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

5-String Recovery, Part One (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

If you take a Missouri boy who grew up with bluegrass music and encourage his natural talent for playing it well, you’ll have the ingredients for an awesome career very few can achieve.

Young Phillip Wadlow was that Missouri boy. Everything was falling into place for him, until drugs and alcohol threatened to destroy him and all he held dear. This is his story and his music, in two parts. This interview was recorded in May of 1990, as Phil was completing his first year of recovery and sobriety. It’s a story Phil wants young people to hear, for he hopes they can learn from the wrong turns he took.

In this part, Part One, Phil shares how he began using marijuana at a very young age, and how so quickly its use became chronic. But Phil also shares about the music he grew up with and how, at 16, he won a national bluegrass championship. He plays the song that took first place, “Cattle in the Cane.” The joy of being recognized for his music, however, was tainted by the fact he was, by then, completely dependent upon his drug of choice.

Dr. Sutton, the host in this interview, picks up his guitar and accompanies Phil on most of the songs in both parts on the interview. The banjo solo at the opening is an original composition of Phil’s, “Dusty Roads.” (22:12)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file, right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE.