Tag Archives: managing stress

Compassion Fatigue: Caring for the Caregiver (Loren Gelberg-Goff)

BTRadioIntThis program, taken from our archives, addresses a concern among all types of caregivers. Dr. Sutton, host of The Changing Behavior Network, interviews Loren Gelberg-Goff on this very important topic of compassion fatigue.

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A Good Quality, But …

Compassion is a good quality for any person to have. But too much compassion for too long can cause one to become dejected and weary. It can even make folks sick as it takes a toll on persons of high purpose and intent.

Compassion Fatigue

Loren Gelberg-Goff, Compassion FatigueWhen a person is a caregiver of others, either as a family member or as a profession, there will always be a risk for compassion fatigue. It’s a condition affecting good people, and, when children and grandchildren are in the home, how we deal with it is on display. How do we recognize the symptoms of compassion fatigue, and how is it managed and treated, or, if possible, avoided? Our guest on this program, author and psychotherapist Loren Gelberg-Goff, will help us with answers to these very important questions and concerns.

Loren Gelberg-Goff, LCSW

Being Well Within, Loren Gelberg-GoffAs a licensed clinical socialworker, Loren operates a thriving private practice in which she supports and encourages individuals to live their lives authentically empowered and fulfilled. She also provides training and keynotes on related topics of work and family balance, managing anger, dealing with stress, and expressing forgiveness, just to list a few. Loren is the co-author of the book, Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed. (The other co-author is Carmel-Ann Mania, also a health service professional.) (26:47)

http://www.beingwellwithin.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

 

Compassion Fatigue: Healing the Healer (Guest: Loren Gelberg-Goff)

BTRadioIntCompassion is a good quality for any person to have. But too much compassion for too long can cause one to become dejected and weary. It can even make folks sick as it takes a toll on persons of high purpose and intent.

LorenGphotoWhen a person is a caregiver of others, either as a family member or as a profession, there will always be a risk for compassion fatigue. It’s a condition affecting good people, and, when children and grandchildren are in the home, how we deal with it is on display. How do we recognize the symptoms of compassion fatigue, and how is it managed and treated, or, if possible, avoided? Our guest on this program, author and psychotherapist Loren Gelberg-Goff, will help us with answers to these very important questions and concerns.

LGGbookAs a licensed clinical socialworker, Loren operates a thriving private practice in which she supports and encourages individuals to live their lives authentically empowered and fulfilled. She also provides training and keynotes on related topics of work and family balance, managing anger, dealing with stress, and expressing forgiveness, just to list a few. Loren is the co-author of the book, Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed. (The other co-author is Carmel-Ann Mania, also a health service professional.) (26:31)

http://www.beingwellwithin.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Stress in the Family: Its Effects and What to Do About It (Guest: Dr. Kristen Lee Costa)

BTRadioIntAlthough most everyone would agree stress is part of life, there wouldn’t be much life if there was no stress at all. Stresses and forces in our lives serve a purpose in pushing us along toward our dreams and goals.

Dr Kris color cropped finalBut, of course, too much stress can wreck a life and harm a family. So we need enough to function and grow, but not so much that it limits hope and makes us sick. Balance is the answer. How do we find it and keep it?

What are the effects of fast-paced, warp-speed lifestyles on the family? How do parents, children and teens interpret and manage all the expectations they experience, as well as the demands they put upon themselves. Why is it happening and what can be done about it? How do we reach and teach balance and resilience in ways that are healthy and sustainable?

“America’s Stress and Burnout Doc,” Dr. Kristen Lee Costa, is here to help us with these questions and concerns. As a parent, she understands the challenges that affect a family’s ability to bounce back from trying circumstances. What she shares on this program can make the difference between surviving or thriving in a world overflowing with challenges. What better skills could we teach our children?

BOOK COVER FINALDr. Kris will share with us her RESET model, a framework that’s been called “a breakthrough model for reframing stress.” As the Department Chair for Behavioral Sciences at Northeastern University, Dr. Kris’s research and teaching interests include individual and organiational well-being and resilience. She operates a clinical and consulting practice devoted to preventing and treating burnout and has worked with thousands of families. Dr. Kris is the author of RESET: Make the Most of Your Stress, winner of the Next Generation Indie Book Awards Motivational Book of 2015. She’s also a regular contributor for the Huffington Post and Psychology Today. (27:16)

http://www.resetyourstress.com

 

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Link as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Compassion Fatigue: Healing the Healer (Guest: Loren Gelberg-Goff)

BTRadioIntCompassion is a good quality for any person to have. But too much compassion for too long can cause one to become dejected and weary. It can even make folks sick as it takes a toll on persons of high purpose and intent.

LorenGphotoWhen a person is a caregiver of others, either as a family member or as a profession, there will always be a risk for compassion fatigue. It’s a condition affecting good people, and, when children and grandchildren are in the home, how we deal with it is on display. How do we recognize the symptoms of compassion fatigue, and how is it managed and treated, or, if possible, avoided? Our guest on this program, author and psychotherapist Loren Gelberg-Goff, will help us with answers to these very important questions and concerns.

LGGbookAs a licensed clinical socialworker, Loren operates a thriving private practice in which she supports and encourages individuals to live their lives authentically empowered and fulfilled. She also provides training and keynotes on related topics of work and family balance, managing anger, dealing with stress, and expressing forgiveness, just to list a few. Loren is the co-author of the book, Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed. (The other co-author is Carmel-Ann Mania, also a health service professional.) (26:31)

http://www.beingwellwithin.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Be Patient with Yourself While Making Changes (Loren Gelberg-Goff)

BTLifesMomentsWe live in a time where everything now moves at a hyper-accelerated pace. We expect instant gratification, and most people have very little tolerance for things happening at even a slightly slower rate – we want everything NOW!

LorenGphotoThere’s even a bumper sticker that says “God, grant me patience…BUT HURRY.” Most people laugh at this sentiment, but it unfortunately reflects our current culture and lifestyle quite accurately.

Today, in contrast, I’m going to ask you to go against all of that – the urge to hurry, and the tendency toward impatience with anything that doesn’t come to you immediately. In particular I’m focusing on making those changes in yourself that you’ve identified as potentially most beneficial.

Be aware that you are probably placing enormous expectations on yourself, to make these changes quickly (and easily, if we’re being really honest – after all, who wants making changes to be hard work? Nobody – including yours truly!).

LGGbookSo rule number one in looking at the changes you want to make, and coming up with reasonable expectations regarding the time frame for developing expertise in your new ways of thinking and behaving, is to slow down. It takes 28 days to establish a new habit, and that’s with deliberate daily practice of the habit you want to create.

To give you an example, think about when you first started with the affirmation “Who I am is enough.” It probably felt awkward and strange, right? You were so used to feeling “I’m NOT enough” that your whole being resisted buying into the new belief. But if you have been practicing that affirmation daily as I’ve suggested, I’m guessing not only that it now feels more true and therefore comfortable, but also that saying it feels more natural as well. If not, I suspect you’re probably not really practicing it as recommended!

The point is, these changes take time, practice and perseverance. There is no getting around that; there’s no quick fix when it comes to reclaiming your true, unlimited, fully realized self. This is an ongoing process, which can include various techniques, tools, ideas and exercises – whatever it takes to get back the parts of your uniquely gifted, glorious self that have been suppressed, squelched and otherwise lost over your lifetime so far.

Think of it like a “power workout” program for developing physical strength: We are now rebuilding your inner core. You’ll get the most out of this process if you can see it as a true virtual treasure hunt – really worthwhile treasures don’t materialize overnight, so patience and perseverance are your most helpful allies in deriving the biggest benefits.

Keep that in mind as we go through this month, and be gentle with yourself! Let your expectations be flexible and adjustable, while holding onto your commitment to get to your desired outcome – those changes you want to see in yourself!

Your one-week “assignment” is to:

1. Identify 3-5 Changes you would really like to make in 2015, and rank them in importance by envisioning the impact they could have on your life and happiness.

2. Honestly Evaluate how entrenched you are in your current habits as they relate to these desired changes, and how willing you are to let go of those habits, then re-rank the list of changes in order from lowest to highest perceived difficulty to change.

3. Chunk Down the seemingly impossible changes into smaller, “bite-sized” changes that are more manageable; for instance, you could break down “stop getting mad at myself when I forget things” into two separate changes:

Change #1 might be: “Always follow getting mad at myself with the affirmation, ‘I forgive myself with love, because I deserve forgiveness’ until I’ve mastered that.” And after you’ve established that as a consistent habit, move on to change #2.

Change #2: “When I start to get mad at myself, remember to STOP! BREATHE! and FOCUS! Then say the affirmation, ‘Well I didn’t do that perfectly, and that’s ok – I’m human, and Who I Am Is Enough!’ Then take another breath.”

4. Slow Down your awareness, so that whenever an old habit occurs you catch it, then take the time to do your new practice.

5. Celebrate Yourself! ALWAYS be sure to congratulate yourself for catching old habits as they occur, and for remembering to practice your new behaviors. Shower yourself with LOVE and APPRECIATION, and feel the JOY of getting back the TRUE YOU that you were always meant to be!

I hope you like the five-step process in this post and remember, BREATHE! –Loren

 

Loren Gelberg-Goff, LCSW is best known for creating powerful, life-changing programs for women: “Take Back Your Life”. She believes that everyone has the power to live free of chronic, daily anxiety and overwhelm without having to constantly feel guilty, angry &/or resentful.  You can learn more about her work and read a chapter from her book at:
www.beingwellwithin.com/fromdistressedtode-stressed

 

 

Compassion Fatigue: Healing the Healer (Guest: Loren Gelberg-Goff)

LorenGphoto Compassion is a good quality for any person to have. But too much compassion for too long can cause one to become dejected and weary. It can even make folks sick as it takes a toll on persons of high purpose and intent.

In being a caregiver of others, either as a family member or as a profession, there will always be a risk for compassion fatigue. How do we recognize it, and how is compassion fatigue managed and treated, or, if possible, avoided? Our guest on this program, psychotherapist Loren Gelberg-Goff, will help us with answers to these very important questions and concerns.

LGGbookAs a licensed clinical socialworker, Loren operates a thriving private practice in which she supports and encourages individuals to live their lives authentically empowered and fulfilled. She also provides training and keynotes on related topics of work and family balance, managing anger, dealing with stress, and expressing forgiveness, just to list a few. Loren is the co-author of the book, Being Well Within: From Distressed to De-Stressed. (The other co-author is Carmel-Ann Mania, also a health service professional.) (26:31)

http://www.beingwellwithin.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

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