Tag Archives: recovery

Five String Recovery, Part 2 (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

A 16-year-old musician wins a national bluegrass championship while secretly battling addiction. Here’s the second of his two-part story about his recovery, his music, and his message to young people.

…………………………….

Five String Recovery, Phillip WadlowThis is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now, but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Five String Recovery, Part 1 (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

A 16-year-old musician wins a national bluegrass championship while secretly battling addiction. Here’s his two-part story about his recovery, his music, and his message to young people.

…………………………….

Five String Recovery, Phil Wadlow, The Changing Behavior Network

If you take a Missouri boy who grew up with bluegrass music and encourage his natural talent for playing it well, you’ll have the ingredients for an awesome career very few can achieve.

Young Phillip Wadlow was that Missouri boy. Everything was falling into place for him, until drugs and alcohol threatened to destroy him and all he held dear. This is his story and his music, in two parts. This interview was recorded in May of 1990, as Phil was completing his first year of recovery and sobriety. It’s a story Phil wants young people to hear, for he hopes they can learn from the wrong turns he took.Five String Recovery, Phillip Wadlow

In this part, Part One, Phil shares how he began using marijuana at a very young age, and how so quickly its use became chronic. But Phil also shares about the music he grew up with and how, at 16, he won a national bluegrass championship. He plays the song that took first place, “Cattle in the Cane.” The joy of being recognized for his music, however, was tainted by the fact he was, by then, completely dependent upon his drug of choice.

Dr. Sutton, the host in this interview, picks up his guitar and accompanies Phil on most of the songs in both parts on the interview. The banjo solo at the opening is an original composition of Phil’s, “Dusty Roads.” (22:12)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file, right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE.


(START/STOP Audio)

Resilience: A path Through Difficult Times (Guest: Kristen Brown)

BTRadioInt-300x75This is a repost of a great interview with Kristen done April 29, 2012.

Life can be difficult, sometimes VERY difficult. How we manage those trying times and circumstances matters.

Resilience, the coming back from deep sadness, tremendous stress and heartbreak, is never a level path connecting loss to recovery. It has many twists, turns, hills and valleys, with struggle, frustration and doubt as part of the journey.

Kristen Brown gives us a good look at what resilience is all about. She and her husband, Todd, were 30. They had it all, a nice home, a secure job and Brooke, their beautiful baby girl. Then, with no warning at all, Todd, an athlete in high school, dies suddenly of a heart attack. For her sake and Brooke’s, Kristen resolved to not only survive and recover, but to thrive in the face of adversity.

This is Kristen’s story, including how she started and operates several successful ventures, wrote a best-selling book, The Best Worst Thing; a Memoir, and continues to reach out with support and encouragement to others who also must travel a path they didn’t choose. (27:04)

Kristen operates a number of business and support websites. All can be accessed through:

www.KristenKBrown.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Resilience: A Path Through Difficult Times (Guest: Kristen Brown)

This is a repost of a great interview with Kristen done April 29, 2012.

 

Life can be difficult, sometimes VERY difficult. How we manage those trying times and circumstances matters.

Resilience, the coming back from deep sadness, tremendous stress and heartbreak, is never a level path connecting loss to recovery. It has many twists, turns, hills and valleys, with struggle, frustration and doubt as part of the journey.

Kristen Brown gives us a good look at what resilience is all about. She and her husband, Todd, were 30. They had it all, a nice home, a secure job and Brooke, their beautiful baby girl. Then, with no warning at all, Todd, an athlete in high school, dies suddenly of a heart attack. For her sake and Brooke’s, Kristen resolved to not only survive and recover, but to thrive in the face of adversity.

This is Kristen’s story, including how she started and operates several successful ventures, wrote a best-selling book, The Best Worst Thing; a Memoir, and continues to reach out with support and encouragement to others who also must travel a path they didn’t choose. (27:04)

Kristen operates a number of business and support websites. All can be accessed through:

www.KristenKBrown.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Five-string Recovery, Part Two (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

This is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now, but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Five-string Recovery, Part One (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

If you take a Missouri boy who grew up with bluegrass music and encourage his natural talent for playing it well, you’ll have the ingredients for an awesome career very few can achieve.

Young Phillip Wadlow was that Missouri boy. Everything was falling into place for him, until drugs and alcohol threatened to destroy him and all he held dear. This is his story and his music, in two parts. This interview was recorded in May of 1990, as Phil was completing his first year of recovery and sobriety. It’s a story Phil wants young people to hear, for he hopes they can learn from the wrong turns he took.

In this part, Part One, Phil shares how he began using marijuana at a very young age, and how so quickly its use became chronic. But Phil also shares about the music he grew up with and how, at 16, he won a national bluegrass championship. He plays the song that took first place, “Cattle in the Cane.” The joy of being recognized for his music, however, was tainted by the fact he was, by then, completely dependent upon his drug of choice.

Dr. Sutton, the host in this interview, picks up his guitar and accompanies Phil on most of the songs in both parts on the interview. The banjo solo at the opening is an original composition of Phil’s, “Dusty Roads.” (22:12)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file, right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE.

COMING SOON: Five-string Recovery, Part Two (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

Growing Up Ziglar: Lessons Learned and Shared–Part Two (Guest: Julie Ziglar Norman)

Thirteen is a delicate age. It’s a transition out of childhood that brings with it enough challenges and adjustments. But what happens when you’re thirteen and you and your family move from South Carolina to the fast pace of Dallas, Texas? What happens when you never have a chance to say goodbye to your best friend, your horse? As what happens as your father, Zig Ziglar, is quickly becoming one of the most-popular and most-loved speakers on the planet?

Our guest today, Julie Ziglar Norman, shares these experiences in this candid and inspiring interview, but she she’s quick to point out that problems, challenges and heartaches didn’t stop when she (or anyone else) turned fourteen. As she shares her story, Julie makes it clear that, even with great parents and a close family, poor choices can bring on consequences that are difficult to bear. And, like so many young people, Julie was good at covering everything with a smile and a “I’m just fine” facade.

But she wasn’t fine, and that’s the message she wants parents and young people to hear. Julie shares how she addressed the poor choices she made, some of them years later. It wasn’t easy, but it was life-changing. Julie shares freely about how, for her, those changes were rooted in faith, forgiveness and practiced principles of Christianity.

Today Julie, like her dad, is an accomplished and sought-after speaker. She is the founder of Ziglar Women, a Christian ministry that encourages and empowers women. She is the author of Growing Up Ziglar: A Daughter’s Broken Journey from Heartache to Hope (published by Guideposts). (26:55)

www.julieziglarnorman.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON! Children Behaving Desperately: Insights and Interventions (Guest: Dr. James Sutton)

 

Growing Up Ziglar: Lessons Learned and Shared–Part One (Guest: Julie Ziglar Norman)

Thirteen is a delicate age. It’s a transition out of childhood that brings with it enough challenges and adjustments. But what happens when you’re thirteen and you and your family move from South Carolina to the fast pace of Dallas, Texas? What happens when you never have a chance to say goodbye to your best friend, your horse? As what happens as your father, Zig Ziglar, is quickly becoming one of the most-popular and most-loved speakers on the planet?

Our guest today, Julie Ziglar Norman, shares these experiences in this candid and inspiring interview, but she she’s quick to point out that problems, challenges and heartaches didn’t stop when she (or anyone else) turned fourteen. As she shares her story, Julie makes it clear that, even with great parents and a close family, poor choices can bring on consequences that are difficult to bear. And, like so many young people, Julie was good at covering everything with a smile and a “I’m just fine” facade.

But she wasn’t fine, and that’s the message she wants parents and young people to hear. Julie shares how she addressed the poor choices she made, some of them years later. It wasn’t easy, but it was life-changing. Julie shares freely about how, for her, those changes were rooted in faith, forgiveness and practiced  principles of Christianity.

Today Julie, like her dad, is an accomplished and sought-after speaker. She is the founder of Ziglar Women, a Christian ministry that encourages and empowers women.  She is the author of Growing Up Ziglar: A Daughter’s Broken Journey from Heartache to Hope (published by Guideposts). (26:25)

www.julieziglarnorman.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON! Growing Up Ziglar: Lessons Learned and Shared, Part Two Guest: Julie Ziglar Norman)

 

 

Resilience: A Path Through Difficult Times (Guest: Kristen Brown)

Life can be difficult, sometimes VERY difficult. How we manage those trying times and circumstances matters.

Resilience, the coming back from deep sadness, tremendous stress and heartbreak, is never a level path connecting loss to recovery. It has many twists, turns, hills and valleys, with struggle, frustration and doubt as part of the journey.

Kristen Brown gives us a good look at what resilience is all about. She and her husband, Todd, were 30. They had it all, a nice home, a secure job and Brooke, their beautiful baby girl. Then, with no warning at all, Todd, an athlete in high school, dies suddenly of a heart attack. For her sake and Brooke’s, Kristen resolved to not only survive and recover, but to thrive in the face of adversity.

This is Kristen’s story, including how she started and operates several successful ventures, wrote a best-selling book, The Best Worst Thing; a Memoir, and continues to reach out with support and encouragement to others who also must travel a path they didn’t choose. (27:04)

Kristen operates a number of business and support websites. All can be accessed through:

www.KristenKBrown.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

5-String Recovery, Part Two (Guest: Phillip Wadlow)

This is the concluding part of 5-String Recovery with guest, Phillip Wadlow. In this part he tells of moving into adulthood with his drug and alcohol addiction, and how it affected his marriage, his children, his work, and his health. He also shares how he came to realize he needed treatment, and he tells of that experience. Throughout the interview, Phil plays some of the music that was such a significant part of his life, and shares how he’d like to use his music as an avenue for reaching out to young people. (Dr. Sutton, the interviewer, plays back-up guitar, except for the sad, but appropriate, guitar solo that represents one of the lowest points in Phil’s life.)

The original message of this interview was a cassette tape program, thus the reference to the cassette near the end of the program. Because Phil did move around quite a bit over the years, it is not know exactly where he is now,  but life goes on. His children are grown now, of course, and it is know that he has remarried and, at last word, he and his wife were managing an apartment complex in Missouri.

There is a powerful message Phil wants young people need to hear, and this is it: Although one can recover from drugs and alcohol and work a program of dedicated sobriety, the costs of addiction impose many losses than cannot be recovered. Unless one takes responsibility for those losses, instead of blaming others, complete recovery is difficult, indeed. (20:40)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK