Tag Archives: adversity

Doing What Must Be Done (Guest: Chad Hymas)

BTRadioIntListen in as Chad tells his story of dealing with life-changing circumstances. Much more than that, however, is the way he encourages us all to manage challenges of all kinds.
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ChadHymasphotoAt some point most everyone has faced adversity in one form or another. But what about the sort of adversity that forever affects the remainder of one’s life, the bone-jarring kind of event or circumstance that challenges even one’s will to carry on? Even then, can adversity push us to become MORE that we ever imagined?

It seems so.

An accident on his ranch left young Chad Hymas paralyzed from the waist down with very limited use of his upper body. In this moving and fast-paced program, he will share the challenges he faced as his plans for himself and his family were changed in a heartbeat. But Chad will also share how his experiences opened new opportunities for him to serve and encourage others.

ChadHymasbookChad is a sought-after inspirational speaker and author of the book, Doing What Must Be Done. He travels as much as 300,000 miles a year sharing his special brand of encouragement and hope to audiences of all types worldwide. He is a world-class wheelchair athlete. In 2003, Chad set a world record by wheeling a personal marathon of over 500 miles from Salt Lake City to Las Vegas. He’s also one of the youngest members ever to be inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Speaker Hall of Fame. (27:39)

http://www.ChadHymas.com

 

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Turbulent Times: Discussing Them with Your Children (Dr. James Sutton)

BTQuestions

If you have questions or suggestions regarding how we can best help our children through difficult events and circumstances, please share them on the SUPPORT FORUM.

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My child worries excessively. All the bad news on television and other media keeps her upset constantly. Just this past week she asked her father to buy a Geiger counter so we could see if our home was radioactive. What should we say and do to help her calm down a bit?

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Jim415smThis is an excellent and timely question. Some children (and adults) are more sensitive to events and circumstances than others. It’s a safe bet, however, that trouble, threat and difficulty aren’t going to go away, so it helps to soothe and fortify our children when and where we can.

Worry and concern are nothing new. When our parents and grandparents were young, they worried that the Japanese would attack the west coast. In fact, there was conjecture that an attack could reach as far as Chicago. Then, after the Korean Conflict, we focused on the Russians and the atomic bomb. I can still remember the A-bomb drills in elementary school. (Does anyone remember the slogan, “When you see the flash, DUCK and COVER!”) Businesses selling family fallout shelters you could bury in your back yard seemed to spring up overnight. From earthquakes and runaway nuclear reactors to idiots bringing guns to school and using them, trouble and threat stoke enough fear to upset anyone.

We can’t shelter and shield our children from every shred of news they encounter, nor should we. But we can offer them clarification and support.

Here are a few suggestions in response to this mother’s timely and concern-laden question.

— Always remember, kids personalize EVERYTHING. That’s just the way they are. When a child expresses empathy for the children victimized by the earthquakes, tsunamis and nuclear threats, a deeper message could well be, “What if that had happened to ME?” Although their benevolence and concerns for others are genuine, their more troubled thoughts are often much closer to home.

— Don’t minimize their worries or their feelings. Saying, “Now don’t you worry about that!” doesn’t make worry go away. Often it only causes a child to feel foolish for experiencing a valid emotion: fear. It’s better to say something like, “I understand your concern; can I help you with that?”

tsunami— Clarify the facts. When kids don’t have good facts, they make up their own, and they’re usually more dismal than the truth. A child growing up in Kansas might fret about tornados, but she can be shown how a tsunami isn’t very likely at all, or how thousands of miles of ocean protect us pretty well from the reactor problems in northern Japan. (It would help to let her reinforce this conclusion by showing her a globe or a world map.)

— Offer soothing and support through family rituals. Hug them more, touch them often and keep a dialog open. I can still remember warmly my parents or my grandmother sitting with me as I said my bedtime prayers. Those were special moments; they made (and still make) a difference.

— Suggest how they might help. Doing something no only helps others, but it offers a sense of control over worry and concern. A child could be encouraged to collect aluminum cans with proceeds going to Red Cross assistance in recovery. Better yet, the youngster could get friends involved, adding to the effort.

CD(Back in the days of the A-bomb scare, my father was a Civil Defense Block Warden. He went to meetings, attended first-aid classes and stayed prepared, just in case. I can’t tell you how many “pretend” head injuries and broken arms my sister and I sustained for the cause. Bottom line: Dad felt better when he could DO something. It’s the same with our children.)

— Remain observant. Note any changes in eating or sleeping patterns, or continuing signs of excessive stress or anxiety. Note also if the child has more difficulty than usual handling everyday frustration. Monitor performance and grades at school, also.

— Seek assistance, if needed. Although a child’s parents should a first-line resource for help and comforting, it’s possible the parents could feel overwhelmed in the effort. Input from others, such as the school counselor or a family’s pastor, could prove helpful. ###

Psychologist Dr. James Sutton is the founder and host of The Changing Behavior Network.

 

A Foot on the Dinner Table: Claiming Victory From Adversity (Dr. James Sutton)

BTLifesMomentsI was addressing a group of adults some time back; I threw them this challenge:

What would you think if you were at a nice dinner with about nine or ten other folks, and one of them put his bare foot on your table?

The general consensus was they’d be pretty disgusted. Their facial gestures indicated that, if that happened at their table, dinner would be OVER whether they had finished eating or not.

But what if that person had no arms?

That one variable changes everything, doesn’t it? It takes our preconceived notions and attitudes and completely removes them from the picture.

This described an experience of mine at a convention. One of my tablemates had no arms. He ate with his feet. He also drank with his feet and took notes with his feet.

He even wrote a book with his feet. Amazing.

footThis man, a Canadian, is a very successful speaker on the topic of dealing with adversity. Folks will listen to him. He walks his talk.

What an inspiration. And I think I’m having a tough day when I’m battling a sore throat.

I’m very clear on the fact that no rational person ASKS to tackle the challenges of this world without his arms. But things happen; life sometimes can throw us some huge challenges.

What we DO with the challenges can be a measure of our character, our resolve … and our resiliency. ###

Doing What Must Be Done: Dealing with Adversity (Chad Hymas)

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This is a repost of an earlier popular interview on managing adversity.

 

ChadHymasphotoAt some point most everyone has faced adversity in one form or another. But what about the sort of adversity that forever affects the remainder of one’s life, the bone-jarring kind of event or circumstance that challenges even one’s will to carry on? Even then, can adversity push us to become MORE that we ever imagined?

It seems so.

An accident on his ranch left young Chad Hymas paralyzed from the waist down with very limited use of his upper body. In this moving and fast-paced program, he will share the challenges he faced as his plans for himself and his family were changed in a heartbeat. But Chad will also share how his experiences opened new opportunities for him to serve and encourage others.

ChadHymasbookChad is a sought-after inspirational speaker and author of the book, Doing What Must Be Done. He travels as much as 300,000 miles a year sharing his special brand of encouragement and hope to audiences of all types worldwide. He is a world-class wheelchair athlete. In 2003, Chad set a world record by wheeling a personal marathon of over 500 miles from Salt Lake City to Las Vegas. He’s also one of the youngest members ever to be inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Speaker Hall of Fame. (27:39)

http://www.ChadHymas.com

 

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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Doing What Must Be Done (Guest: Chad Hymas)

ChadHymasphotoAt some point most everyone has faced adversity in one form or another. But what about the sort of adversity that forever affects the remainder of one’s life, the bone-jarring kind of event or circumstance that challenges even one’s will to carry on? Even then, can adversity push us to become MORE that we ever imagined?

It seems so.

An accident on his ranch left young Chad Hymas paralyzed from the waist down with very limited use of his upper body. In this moving and fast-paced program, he will share the challenges he faced as his plans for himself and his family were changed in a heartbeat. But Chad will also share how his experiences opened new opportunities for him to serve and encourage others.

ChadHymasbookChad is a sought-after inspirational speaker and author of the book, Doing What Must Be Done. He travels as much as 300,000 miles a year sharing his special brand of encouragement and hope to audiences of all types worldwide. He is a world-class wheelchair athlete. In 2003, Chad set a world record by wheeling a personal marathon of over 500 miles from Salt Lake City to Las Vegas. He’s also one of the youngest members ever to be inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Speaker Hall of Fame. (27:39)

http://www.ChadHymas.com

 

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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Attitude Matters: Never Give Up (Guest: LaDene Mayville)

LaDeneMayvillephotoWhen we’re old enough to realize that the world out there isn’t always kind and safe, we begin to understand that struggle, difficulty and adversity are simply a part of the whole experience we call LIFE.

How we manage difficulty says a lot about us, but how we teach and encourage our children to manage difficulty says the rest. What better gift could a parent give a child or a teacher give a student?

LMayvillecoverOur guest on this program, LaDene Mayville, not only knows this subject well, she believes strongly that the defining characteristic for overcoming difficulty is attitude. “When we encounter challenges and disappointments one after another,” says LaDene, “it’s so easy to give up hope and want to quit. But if we don’t get back on our feet and keep on moving, we may never know the blessings that could be just around the corner.”

Drawing on her experiences as a storytime teacher of kindergarteners in an inner-city school, as well as her desire to encourage others as they navigate difficult circumstances, LaDene authored her first book, Hallie the Harvester Ant: Never Give Up. It’s a children’s book with a message for us all. (27:17)

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The Road to Resiliency (Guest: Troy Payne)

TPaynephotoStruggle is part of life, but when does struggle become adversity? And how do we overcome adversity in our lives and strive for resiliency?

Young people are especially vulnerable when it comes to adversity in their lives, be it poverty, loss, illness or abuse. Their resources for recovery are limited. For them, our involvement, our help, is worth the effort, and then some.

Our guest on this program, Troy Payne, will share, through his story, what resiliency is and what resilient components we need to have in order to overcome adversity. He will also share how we can be a valued resource to those that struggle.

TPayneBookFollowing a career as a youth and family counselor, Troy founded a company, Wellness Realization, and now dedicates his efforts as a speaker, musician and author to helping others overcome adversity and find resilience. His band, “Aside from Sorrow,” has completed two albums that carry their message. The first album, “Out of Darkness, Into the Light,” is the soundtrack to Troy’s internationally best-selling book, The Road to Resiliency. (24:35)

http://www.wellnessrealization.net

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

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Doing What Must Be Done (Guest: Chad Hymas)

ChadHymasphotoAt some point most everyone has faced adversity in one form or another. But what about the sort of adversity that forever affects the remainder of one’s life, the bone-jarring kind of event or circumstance that challenges even one’s will to carry on? Even then, can adversity push us to become MORE that we ever imagined?

It seems so.

An accident on his ranch left young Chad Hymas paralyzed from the waist down with very limited use of his upper body. In this moving and fast-paced program, he will share the challenges he faced as his plans for himself and his family were changed in a heartbeat. But Chad will also share how his experiences opened new opportunities for him to serve and encourage others.

ChadHymasbookChad is a sought-after inspirational speaker and author of the book, Doing What Must Be Done. He travels as much as 300,000 miles a year sharing his special brand of encouragement and hope to audiences of all types worldwide. He is a world-class wheelchair athlete. In 2003, Chad set a world record by wheeling a personal marathon of over 500 miles from Salt Lake City to Las Vegas. He’s also one of the youngest members ever to be inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Speaker Hall of Fame. (27:39)

http://www.ChadHymas.com

 

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON: Child-Centered Divorce: Getting it Right, Part One (Guest: Rosalind Sedacca)