Tag Archives: confidence

Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Radio-style Interview, The Changing Behavior NetworkCharacter does count. In this second of a two-part interview from our archives, former educator and skilled author, Barbara Lewis, helps us gain more insight into ways to help teens identify and strengthen traits of character.

………………………………………….

Barbara A. Lewis, Helping Teens Buuild CharacterSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

What Do You Stand For?, Barbara LewisAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this second of a two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (24:29)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Helping Teens Build Character, Part One (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

 

Radio-style Interview, The Changing Behavior NetworkCharacter does count. In this two-part interview from our archives, former educator and skilled author, Barbara Lewis, helps us gain more insight into ways to help teens identify and strengthen traits of character.

………………………………………….

Barbara A. LewisSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

What Do You Stand For?, Barbara LewisAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Teens: Building Character for the Future, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75Building character into the lives of our young people can pay substantial dividends in their future. As always, character counts.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development, character education, and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Teens: Building Character for the Future, Part One (Guest: Barbara Lewis)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75Building character into the lives of our young people can pay substantial dividends in their future. As always, character counts.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development, character education, and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Goal-setting and Consistency Help Children Gain Confidence (Christy Monson)

BTAboutThemWe all like to plan and set goals at the first of a new year. One of the most important is to consider how we can help our children feel confident.

What skills do they want to learn? How can we help them set short-term and long-term goals?

CMonsonphotoDecide a daily plan of action with your child, and then be consistent in the follow-through.

Marietta’s Concern

Eight-year-old Marietta knows she’s not a very good reader. She came home from school one day crying; the kids had teased her about her reading in front of the class.

Mom (a single parent) let Marietta share her feelings and then talked with her about the problem. Mom realized that, as a parent, she needed to spend more time with Marietta to help her gain the skills to feel confident.

A Plan with a Goal

Marietta and Mom set a goal to read together every night. Mom worked two nights a week, so they found several reading games Marietta could do by herself when she was with the sitter. The rest of the week they read together.

girlreading

Both mother and daughter devoted themselves to their goals consistently for six months, and Marietta’s reading improved. She developed enough confidence to read in front of the class without faltering. Plus they enjoyed the time they spent together, so they continued setting additional goals with other activities.

A Special Bond

Working together consistently had bonded the two of them in a special way. Mom confided to me later that Marietta’s problems were a blessing in their lives because the goal-time they spent at first became fun-time as the weeks went by.

 

The PRIMARY reward of goal-setting and

consistency is the parent-child bond you

establish. A SECONDARY reward is all your

child learns in the process.

 

Additional Benefits of Goal-setting and Consistency

LOVE: I know you care about me enough to help me.

SELF-ESTEEM: I feel great about myself because I can see myself growing.

CONFIDENCE:  I can negotiate my goals to meet my needs and wants.

SKILL: I am good at the things I am practicing.

SECURITY: I know how to take care of myself and my surroundings.

PROBLEM-SOLVING ABILITY: If a problem arises, I can solve it.

ACCOUNTABILITY: I am accountable for my progress and growth.

 

Change doesn’t happen overnight. But, as we consistently set goals with our children and work with them daily, we will see progress, growth and change. In doing this we help them along the road to responsible adulthood.

 

Christy Monson, retired marriage and family therapist, writes articles and books that support and strengthen individuals and their families. [website]

 

 

Why Children Today Don’t Get Enough Free Time, Part Two (Amy Robbins-Wilson

This is the second part and conclusion of the interview with Amy Robbins-Wilson. She continues with ideas for promoting more free play and spontaneity, starting with why being “silly” sometimes is a good thing. She and Dr. Sutton also discuss the value of “true” toys, the sort that help foster free and unstructured play. For the young child, Amy suggests a “listening safari.”

Also in this part of the interview, Amy tells us more about her work as a Musical Parenting Expert and a Healing Music Artist, and stresses the value of reaching individuals in their “singing center.” She explains the concept, purpose and value of the Mommy Jingles program. Amy then directs listeners to her website (www.amyrobbinswilson.com) to learn more and to take advantage of all that’s available there, including a blog, a newsletter and something new (and FREE): the Musical Parenting Video Coaching series.

Perhaps the best part of the conclusion of this interview is the special treat at the very end. Amy closes with an unbelievable rendition of one of the most popular Irish lullabies. (20:07)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Why Children Today Don’t Get Enough Free Play, Part One (Guest: Amy Robbins-Wilson

When she was a school counselor, Amy Robbins-Wilson witnessed first-hand how young people were not having nearly enough opportunity for free and imaginative play in their lives. She observed how this affected spontaneity, creativity, overall confidence and even social interaction over time.

In this informative interview, Amy shares her insights into the concern about children’s needs for free and unstructured play and the opportunity to be authentically spontaneous. And, of course, she shares what adults can do to encourage more free play and expression. In this first part of a two-part interview, Amy discussed how important it is for parents to offer their time, presence and interaction, including pauses for “quiet” time and the appreciation of wonder. These lead to a healthy willingness to take risks and grow in the process.

Amy is a therapist specializing as a Musical Parenting Expert and a Healing Music Artist. She is also an author and an award-winning recording artist. Join the interview as Amy shares great ideas on how we can enrich the lives and futures of our children. (20:50)

(This interview concludes in Part Two.)

To listen, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Barbara1Some character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

WDYSFForTeensCoverAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (24:21)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

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COMING SOON: The Raise Responsibility System (Guest: Dr. Marvin Marshall)

Helping Teens Build Character, Part One (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Barbara1Some character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

WDYSFForTeensCoverAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Email this page

COMING SOON: Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Growing Happy Kids (Guest: Maureen Healy)

The first question asked in this interview is, “How would most folks describe a happy child, and would that description be accurate?” It’s an interesting and compelling question.

Our guest on this program, Maureen Healy, will not only answer this question and others, she will share with us the critical characteristic that contribute most to happiness today in our children and teens: CONFIDENCE. She will also share how there is both “outer” and “inner” confidence.

If we use the ideas presented in this program to foster and cultivate more confidence in our young people, the results definitely will pay off for many years to come.

Maureen is an emotional health expert with more than 20 years of experience gained in studying children and their families all over the world. She’s the author of the just-released book, Growing Happy Kids: How to Foster Inner Confidence, Success and Happiness, and she writes for many popular publications and blogs, including Psychology Today, WebMD and Huffington Post. (26:47)

For more information about Maureen, her organization (Growing Happy Kids) and her work, go to this website:

http://www.growinghappykids.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK