Tag Archives: honor

Teens: Building Character for the Future, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75Building character into the lives of our young people can pay substantial dividends in their future. As always, character counts.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development, character education, and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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Teens: Building Character for the Future, Part One (Guest: Barbara Lewis)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75Building character into the lives of our young people can pay substantial dividends in their future. As always, character counts.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development, character education, and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

Letter from a Father: A Call to Duty

BTLifesMomentsGeorge Washington is referred to as “The Father of Our Country,” but it’s interesting to note that he never had any children of his own. He married a widow named Martha Custis; she had children. Her grandson was named after his step-grandfather: George Washington Custis. Washington and this boy were close.
G. W. Custis had a daughter named Mary Anna Custis; she married Robert E. Lee. In turn, the Lees named the first of their seven children G. W. Custis Lee. So Washington and Lee were related, but it took their wives to make it happen.
There’s no argument Robert E. Lee was one of the finest generals to ever come out of West Point. His brilliance as a military leader was matched only by his spiritual values, a deep sense of duty and honor, and his role as a husband and father. (His personal involvement in the Civil War was not about slavery; it was about Virginia.)
Here is part of a letter Lee wrote to his son, George  Washington Custis Lee. The boy was away at school. Although this letter was penned over 150 years ago, it contains a father’s message that is timely even today.

……………………..

… In regard to duty, let me in conclusion to this hasty letter inform you that, nearly a hundred years ago, there was a day of remarkable gloom and darkness. Still known as The Dark Day, it was a day when the light of the sun was slowly extinguished, as if by eclipse.

Quill PenThe legislature of Connecticut was in session. And as the members saw the unexpected and unaccountable darkness coming on, they shared in the general awe and terror. It was supposed by many that the Last Day, The Day of Judgement, had come. Someone in the consternation of the hour moved an adjournment.

Then there arose an old Puritan leader—Davenport of Stamford. He said that, if The Last Day had come, he desired to be found in his place, doing his duty. He therefore moved that candles be brought in so the House could proceed with its duty.

There was quietness in that man’s mind, the quietness of heavenly wisdom and inflexible willingness to obey present duty.

Duty then is the sublimist word in our language. Do your duty in all things, like the old Puritan. You cannot do more; you should never wish to do less. Never let me and your mother ever wear one gray hair for lack of duty on your part.####

History tell us young Custis Lee was faithful and obedient to his father’s call to duty. He rose to the rank of major general in the military of the Confederacy, commanded a full division of the Army of Northern Virginia and, for a time, was an aide-de-camp to President Jefferson Davis. He lived into his 80s during a time when that alone was quite remarkable.

 

Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Barbara1Some character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

WDYSFForTeensCoverAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (24:21)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

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COMING SOON: The Raise Responsibility System (Guest: Dr. Marvin Marshall)

Helping Teens Build Character, Part One (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Barbara1Some character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

WDYSFForTeensCoverAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

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COMING SOON: Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

The Hero in All of Us, Part Two (Guest: Captain Gerald Coffee, USN(ret.)

U. S. Navy (retired) Captain Gerald Coffee’s heroic story is legendary. While flying his RA-5C reconnaissance jet during a combat mission off the aircraft carrier USS Kittyhawk, he was shot down over North Vietnam.

Immediately captured, Jerry was held prisoner for seven years (2,567 days) in the notorious “Hanoi Hilton,” where torture and solitary confinement were routine.

For almost 40 years now, Jerry’s spellbinding keynote talk, Beyond Survival, has inspired thousands worldwide with a life-changing message of hope, faith, courage and honor.

Another mission of Jerry’s has affected our lives more than we know. During the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, the United States was on the brink of war with the Soviet Union. Jerry flew low-level reconnaissance over the island of Cuba, photographing evidence of nuclear armament. The photographs he took, at great personal risk, provided the final evidence President Kennedy needed to implement a naval quarantine (blockade) that halted the stockpiling of Russian nuclear weapons in Cuba. For that alone, Jerry deserves our gratitude.

Dr. Sutton conducted this interview with Jerry in San Angelo, Texas, in 1995. Jerry’s book, Beyond Survival: Building on the Hard Times–a POW’s Story, is available through his website. There’s also an audio program of the same name. Jerry’s story was made into a stage play entitled The Prisoner. (23:14)

www.captaincoffee.com
TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON: Teaching Our Kids to Win at Losing (Guest: Dr. Frank Sileo)

The Hero in All of Us, Part One (Guest: Captain Gerald Coffee, USN(ret.)

U. S. Navy (retired) Captain Gerald Coffee’s heroic story is legendary. While flying his RA-5C reconnaissance jet during a combat mission off the aircraft carrier USS Kittyhawk, he was shot down over North Vietnam.

Immediately captured, Jerry was held prisoner for seven years (2,567 days) in the notorious “Hanoi Hilton,” where torture and solitary confinement were routine.

For almost 40 years now, Jerry’s spellbinding keynote talk, Beyond Survival, has inspired thousands worldwide with a life-changing message of hope, faith, courage and honor.

Another mission of Jerry’s has affected our lives more than we know. During the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, the United States was on the brink of war with the Soviet Union. Jerry flew low-level reconnaissance over the island of Cuba, photographing evidence of nuclear armament. The photographs he took, at great personal risk, provided the final evidence President Kennedy needed to implement a naval quarantine (blockade) that halted the stockpiling of Russian nuclear weapons in Cuba. For that alone, Jerry deserves our gratitude.

Dr. Sutton conducted this interview with Jerry in San Angelo, Texas, in 1995. Jerry’s book, Beyond Survival: Building on the Hard Times–a POW’s Story, is available through his website. There’s also an audio program of the same name. Jerry’s story was made into a stage play entitled The Prisoner. (24:16)

www.captaincoffee.com
TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON: The Hero in All of Us, Part Two (Guest: Former Vietnam POW Captain Gerald Coffee, USN [ret.])