Tag Archives: integrity

Teens: Building Character for the Future, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75Building character into the lives of our young people can pay substantial dividends in their future. As always, character counts.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development, character education, and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


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Teens: Building Character for the Future, Part One (Guest: Barbara Lewis)

BTRadioInt-300x75-300x75Building character into the lives of our young people can pay substantial dividends in their future. As always, character counts.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationSome character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

building character,character counts,Barbara A. Lewis,building character activities,character educationAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development, character education, and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK


(START/STOP Audio)

“Class” (Zig Ziglar)

BTLifesMomentsThe late Zig Ziglar touched the lives of countless individuals; their testimonials would fill volumes. Although my face-to-face time with him was very limited, his philosophy of life strongly influenced mine. I one asked him what message he would have for young people. He said, “I would tell them to play it straight.” To him that meant honesty, integrity, sincerity and humility in all aspects of one’s life, as well as the ability and desire to encourage others. He certainly lived those values. Here’s a great piece he wrote on the quality we call “class.” There’s no better lesson we could teach our children. –JDS
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zigFrom time to time someone gives another individual the ultimate compliment when he or she says, “You are a ‘class act,'” or they simply describe a specific behavior and say, “That’s class.”  From time to time a master of ceremonies will introduce an individual by saying, “If you go to the dictionary and look up the word ‘class,’ you will see a picture of your speaker this evening.”

A person with class is an individual of integrity, someone you would love to have as a parent or child, a friend or a neighbor, a mentor or an advisor.  In short, class identifies a person who is “top drawer,” one who goes the extra mile by being gracious to everyone who courteously serves them.

I love the description given in comments made by Bill Daniels who said that “class is something you choose for yourself.  It’s competing honestly, confronting problems head-on, taking accolades with grace and humility and not knocking your competitors.  If you have class you’re loyal to both yourself and to those around you.  Class is born out of self-respect and a healthy respect for others.  Everything in this world is not always attainable.  Fortunately, class is.”

Class is the coach who gives every child on the team his turn “at bat” without regard to the youngster’s ability or the won-lost record of the team.

I encourage you to identify someone who is a class act and use that person as a role model.  The individual might not be rich and famous or even brilliant, but a person of class is one we can all aspire to be.  Take the class approach and I’ll SEE YOU AT THE TOP! ###

Zig Ziglar is known as America’s Motivator. He authored 33 books and produced numerous training programs. He will be remembered as a man who lived out his faith daily.

 

Identifying and Cultivating Your Child’s Core Strengths (Dr. Daniel Trussell)

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(Email subscribers: Go to the website to see the many “freebies” offered by our guest experts and to listen to radio-style interviews on the podcast player.)

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Most parents want to help develop their child’s strengths but don’t know where to start. It can be overwhelming to determine what your child’s strengths are and then to set up experiences where your child is challenged to activate those strengths.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWhen I ask parents to describe their child’s strengths, I get answers like, “He’s good at getting his way,” or “She excels in soccer” or “He’s a natural artist.” While these are all skills worth cultivating, I want to challenge you to think differently about strengths. In their landmark book, Character Strengths and Virtues ( Oxford University Press, 2004), Peterson and Seligman developed a taxonomy of universal virtues and the strengths associated with each of those six virtues.

Six Virtues
The six virtues found in all cultures include Wisdom, Courage, Humanity Justice, Temperance and Transcendence.

Acting on these virtues not only defines an individual as living a superior life, but also leads to greater life satisfaction both individually and collectively.

Strengths
Peterson and Seligman assigned different strengths that embody each of the universal virtues. They are listed below.

Wisdom and Knowledge— acquiring and using knowledge

Creativity

Curiosity

Judgement and critical thinking

Love of learning

Perspective

 

Courage— accomplishing goals in the face of opposition

Bravery

Persistence

Integrity

Vitality

 

Humanity— strengths of befriending and tending to others

Love

Generosity

Social and emotional intelligence

 

Justice–strengths that build community

Teamwork

Fairness

Leadership

 

Temperance–strengths that protect against excess

Forgiveness and mercy

Humility

Prudence

Self-control

 

Transcendence— strengths that connect us to the larger universe

Appreciation of beauty

Gratitude

Hope

Humor

Spirituality

 

While some of these strengths become evident in the first years of life, others do not develop until adolescence. Although young children can express forgiveness, for example, it is almost always conditional and typically includes an element of revenge. It requires emotional and intellectual development, along with an abundance of life experience to be able to show mercy, forgiveness without revenge.  Young children can  tell jokes and be funny, but humor, the capacity to change another’s affect through bittersweet observation, is often not cultivated until much later in life.

Cultivating Core Strengths

To cultivate a child’s core strengths, that child must be exposed to activities that align with their strengths. No child will have all the virtues and strengths; a good rule of thumb is to determine the top five and the lowest five.  Plan abundant activities that allow a child to use their top strengths and limit activities that require use of their lowest strengths to maximize life satisfaction and general well-being.

If you child is high in appreciation of beauty, you could attend art exhibits, hike to beautiful places or find environments that allow her to get in touch with her appreciation and awe. Conversely, if your child is low in persistence, assign chores that don’t pay great attention to details.

To download a list of activities associated with each strength mentioned here, send me an email to drdanieltrussell@gmail.com or go to 264 Character Building Activities for Kids

 Daniel Trussell, Ph.D., LPC, NCC, CPCS is author of How Families Flourish, a parenting guide using the constructs of applied positive psychology. To learn more about his program go to http://www.howfamiliesflourish.com

 

Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Barbara1Some character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

WDYSFForTeensCoverAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (24:21)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

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COMING SOON: The Raise Responsibility System (Guest: Dr. Marvin Marshall)

Helping Teens Build Character, Part One (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

Barbara1Some character traits are optional. For instance, we can choose to be thrifty, punctual or curious. But other traits, like honesty and a respect for life, are absolutely necessary for a society to survive and thrive. It’s that important.

So if character counts, we would do our children a great service by teaching them early how much it does count, wouldn’t we? As teens begin to grow into adults, it’s especially important they develop positive traits of character and practice them regularly in the real world.

WDYSFForTeensCoverAuthor, educator, and guest on this program, Barbara A. Lewis, believes strongly that young people need to know not only what they stand for, but how they should put it into action. In fact, that’s the title of Barbara’s book for and about teens, What Do You Stand For? A Guide for Building Character. In this two-part program, Barbara will share her insights on character development and how to share it with teens.

Barbara has won many honors and awards as both an author and an educator. She and her work have been featured often in print and broadcast media, including Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Family Circle, “CBS This Morning,” “CBS World News,” and CNN. (20:16)

http://www.BarbaraALewis.com

TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Email this page

COMING SOON: Helping Teens Build Character, Part Two (Guest: Barbara A. Lewis)

The Hero in All of Us, Part Two (Guest: Captain Gerald Coffee, USN(ret.)

U. S. Navy (retired) Captain Gerald Coffee’s heroic story is legendary. While flying his RA-5C reconnaissance jet during a combat mission off the aircraft carrier USS Kittyhawk, he was shot down over North Vietnam.

Immediately captured, Jerry was held prisoner for seven years (2,567 days) in the notorious “Hanoi Hilton,” where torture and solitary confinement were routine.

For almost 40 years now, Jerry’s spellbinding keynote talk, Beyond Survival, has inspired thousands worldwide with a life-changing message of hope, faith, courage and honor.

Another mission of Jerry’s has affected our lives more than we know. During the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, the United States was on the brink of war with the Soviet Union. Jerry flew low-level reconnaissance over the island of Cuba, photographing evidence of nuclear armament. The photographs he took, at great personal risk, provided the final evidence President Kennedy needed to implement a naval quarantine (blockade) that halted the stockpiling of Russian nuclear weapons in Cuba. For that alone, Jerry deserves our gratitude.

Dr. Sutton conducted this interview with Jerry in San Angelo, Texas, in 1995. Jerry’s book, Beyond Survival: Building on the Hard Times–a POW’s Story, is available through his website. There’s also an audio program of the same name. Jerry’s story was made into a stage play entitled The Prisoner. (23:14)

www.captaincoffee.com
TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON: Teaching Our Kids to Win at Losing (Guest: Dr. Frank Sileo)

The Hero in All of Us, Part One (Guest: Captain Gerald Coffee, USN(ret.)

U. S. Navy (retired) Captain Gerald Coffee’s heroic story is legendary. While flying his RA-5C reconnaissance jet during a combat mission off the aircraft carrier USS Kittyhawk, he was shot down over North Vietnam.

Immediately captured, Jerry was held prisoner for seven years (2,567 days) in the notorious “Hanoi Hilton,” where torture and solitary confinement were routine.

For almost 40 years now, Jerry’s spellbinding keynote talk, Beyond Survival, has inspired thousands worldwide with a life-changing message of hope, faith, courage and honor.

Another mission of Jerry’s has affected our lives more than we know. During the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, the United States was on the brink of war with the Soviet Union. Jerry flew low-level reconnaissance over the island of Cuba, photographing evidence of nuclear armament. The photographs he took, at great personal risk, provided the final evidence President Kennedy needed to implement a naval quarantine (blockade) that halted the stockpiling of Russian nuclear weapons in Cuba. For that alone, Jerry deserves our gratitude.

Dr. Sutton conducted this interview with Jerry in San Angelo, Texas, in 1995. Jerry’s book, Beyond Survival: Building on the Hard Times–a POW’s Story, is available through his website. There’s also an audio program of the same name. Jerry’s story was made into a stage play entitled The Prisoner. (24:16)

www.captaincoffee.com
TO LISTEN, use the player below or left-click the link. To access the file right-click and “Save Target as …” to save to your audio device), CLICK HERE FOR LINK

COMING SOON: The Hero in All of Us, Part Two (Guest: Former Vietnam POW Captain Gerald Coffee, USN [ret.])